Extinct megalodon confirmed as the biggest fish in the sea

megalodonillustration

This is an illustrated reconstruction of an adult megalodon.


Oliver E. Demuth

Of all the living fish in the sea, we know the whale shark to be the biggest. At up to eight or nine meters (roughly 28 feet), they eclipse all the other sharks alive in the ocean — and females reign supreme in the size stakes. But it certainly wasn’t always the case, as scientists have finally confirmed.

Published in Historical Biology, a study has confirmed that the now-extinct Otodus megalodon, or megatooth shark, once reached up to 15 meters (49 feet) in length — surpassing the present-day whale shark by almost seven meters (22 feet).

Generally portrayed as a gigantic monster of a shark in films like 2018’s The Meg, the real megalodon was a far cry from the 75

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New Zealand’s Fonterra to sell China dairy farms for $368 mln to focus on home markets

Video: Optimistic Australian CEO’s invest in digital technology (Sky News Australia)

Optimistic Australian CEO’s invest in digital technology

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FILE PHOTO: Fonterra milk tanker driving past dairy cows as it arrives at Fonterra's Te Rapa plant near Hamilton, New Zealand


© Reuters/Nigel Marple
FILE PHOTO: Fonterra milk tanker driving past dairy cows as it arrives at Fonterra’s Te Rapa plant near Hamilton, New Zealand


(Reuters) – New Zealand’s Fonterra said on Monday it has agreed to sell its farms in China for a total of NZ$555 million ($367.97 million) as the dairy producer continues to focus on the domestic market and reduce debt.

The company unveiled plans last year to halt overseas expansion after being criticised by the more than 10,000 farmers who make up its cooperative for its foray into countries like China and value added consumer products that were weighing on its profits.

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“For the last 18 months, we have been reviewing every part of the business to ensure our assets and investments

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India’s new paper Covid-19 test could be a ‘game changer’

The new Feluda test uses a gene-editing technology to detect the virus
The new Feluda test uses a gene-editing technology to detect the virus

A team of scientists in India has developed an inexpensive paper-based test for coronavirus that could give fast results similar to a pregnancy test.

The test, named after a famous Indian fictional detective, is based on a gene-editing technology called Crispr. Scientists estimate that the kit – called Feluda – would return results in under an hour and cost 500 rupees (about $6.75; £5.25).

Feluda will be made by a leading Indian conglomerate, Tata, and could be the world’s first paper-based Covid-19 test available in the market.

“This is a simple, precise, reliable, scalable and frugal test,” Professor K Vijay Raghavan, principal scientific adviser to the Indian government, told the BBC.

Researchers at the Delhi-based Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), where Feluda was developed, as well as private labs, tried out the test on samples from

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London transport regulator strips Ola’s operating licence over public safety failings

By Rebekah Mathew

(Reuters) – London’s public transport authority stripped Indian ride-hailing company Ola of its London operating licence, saying that the taxi app was not “fit and proper” to hold one, having put passenger safety at risk.

Bengaluru-based Ola entered the London taxi market in February this year. The market is dominated by rivals including Uber <UBER.N>, Freenow and Bolt, and traditional black cab drivers who previously blocked streets in protest at what they see as a threat to their livelihoods.

Transport for London (TfL) said in a statement that it refused to grant Ola, a Softbank-backed <9984.T> operator, a new London private hire vehicle (PHV) operator’s licence as it “cannot find it fit and proper to hold one after discovering a number of failures that could have risked public safety.”

TfL’s decision came days after Uber won a legal bid to restore its London operating licence, which was

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How Cannibalism in the Womb May Have Made Megalodon a Titanic Terror | Science

There’s never been a bigger carnivorous shark than Otodus megalodon. At a maximum body size of 50 feet long, this ancient mako relative was the largest shark ever to chomp its way through the seas. No other shark species, even among its close relatives, grew quite so large. But how did megalodon become so exceptional?

A new study, published today in Historical Biology by DePaul University paleontologist Kenshu Shimada and colleagues, suggests that cannibalism in utero may have helped set up the rise of the largest meat-eating shark of all time. The researchers suggest that a biological connection existed between having large, hungry babies, a metabolism that ran warm and increases in size—with the appetites of baby sharks driving their mothers to eat more and get bigger, which led the babies to get bigger themselves.

Shimada and colleagues focused on the size of existing lamniform sharks, using measurements of

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Caltech, other colleges drop SAT and ACT from admissions decisions

But Caltech won’t even consider those tests in the selection of its next two entering classes. It is in the vanguard of a small but growing movement to eliminate the ACT and SAT from admission decisions. The immense educational disruptions of the novel coronavirus pandemic, especially shortages of seats at testing centers, have fueled the development.

Others experimenting with this approach include the University of California at Berkeley and some other UC campuses, Reed College in Oregon, the California State University System and Washington State University. Catholic University, in D.C., said this year it will omit test scores in admissions from now on.

These schools are taking a more radical stance than the “test-optional” movement, which allows applicants to choose whether to send scores. Instead, these schools are declaring themselves “test-blind” or “test-free.”

Nikki Kahealani Chun, director of undergraduate admissions for Caltech, said the 2,200-student school in Pasadena has never

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Amazon Prime Day and earlier holiday shopping will ding Black Friday, Cyber Monday

It’s beginning to look a lot like holiday shopping season even though it’s not Halloween. You can thank evolving shopping habits, COVID-19, a delayed Amazon Prime Day, supply chain concerns, and crimped consumer and business budgets.

The moving parts are going to be enough to make Black Friday more of a 2020 retailing blip than the biggest shopping day of the year.

Simply put, the calendar is moving forward and households won’t have as much to spend. The winners will be Amazon, which is likely to deliver its biggest fourth quarter in history, and retailers such as Walmart, Best Buy, and Target that have mastered buy online pickup in-store and other digital sales tactics.

In addition, Amazon’s rivals are all planning sales around Prime Day. Those moves will just create a flywheel of demand that’ll minimize the importance of retail’s big holiday shopping days.

Consider some data on holiday

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When is iPhone 12 coming out? We may have guessed Apple’s launch date

Although Apple held a September virtual event (here’s everything Apple announced), those expecting iPhones were disappointed — the event focused on the new Apple Watch 6, Apple Watch SE and iPads instead. The announcement date for the iPhone 12, 12 Pro, 12 Max and possible 12 Pro Max (or the iPhone 12 Mini?) remains up in the air. Note that Apple has not confirmed the names of the phones, but we’ll go with those for now. Our best guess, however, as to when Apple will announce the phones is either Oct. 13 or 14.



The iPhone 11 at last year's iPhone launch event. James Martin/CNET


© Provided by CNET
The iPhone 11 at last year’s iPhone launch event. James Martin/CNET

Before we explain why, note that Apple has not released any official information and didn’t respond to a request for comment. What we do know, however, is that the iPhone was definitely delayed “a few weeks” from

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Texas Attorney General Is Accused by Top Aides of Abusing His Office

“The complaint filed against Attorney General Paxton was done to impede an ongoing investigation into criminal wrongdoing by public officials including employees of this office,” the statement said. “Making false claims is a very serious matter and we plan to investigate this to the fullest extent of the law.”

Mr. Paxton, one of the state’s highest-profile elected officials, casts himself as a conservative warrior. He appears often on Fox News and boasts of close ties to the president. Texas is leading the latest major challenge to the Affordable Care Act to reach the Supreme Court. In recent weeks, he has pushed to stop a county clerk from sending out unsolicited ballots, as he raised concerns about election fraud, and has challenged various coronavirus restrictions local governments have imposed.

The complaint is the latest turbulence affecting the Republican Party in Texas, which has a monopoly on statewide offices and controls both

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Nitric oxide a possible treatment for COVID-19, study finds — ScienceDaily

Researchers at Uppsala University have found that an effective way of treating the coronavirus behind the 2003 SARS epidemic also works on the closely related SARS-CoV-2 virus, the culprit in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The substance concerned is nitric oxide (NO), a compound with antiviral properties that is produced by the body itself. The study is published in the journal Redox Biology.

“To our knowledge, nitric oxide is the only substance shown so far to have a direct effect on SARS-CoV-2,” says Åke Lundkvist, a professor at Uppsala University, who led the study.

Since there is still no effective cure for COVID-19, the main emphasis in the treatments tested has been on relieving symptoms. This can shorten hospital stays and reduce mortality. To date, however, it has not been possible to prove that any of these treatments has affected the actual virus behind the infection.

Nitric oxide (NO) is

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