Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers

Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers
An illustration of the crystal structure of ruthenium trichloride showing the simple honeycomb lattice of ruthenium ions and chlorine ions. The twisted octahedra formed by chlorine around the electron spin of each ruthenium atom are mirror images of each other. This twist is key to the compound’s unusual behavior, which is evidence that it may contain an example of a quantum spin liquid. Credit: Courtesy of Arkady Shekhter/ National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

Using a novel technique, scientists working at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have found evidence for a quantum spin liquid, a state of matter that is promising as a building block for the quantum computers of tomorrow.


Researchers discovered the exciting behavior while studying the so-called electron spins in the compound ruthenium trichloride. Their findings, published today in the journal Nature Physics , show that electron spins interact across the material, effectively lowering

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How 2020 Has Pushed Tech To Its Limits

CEO of The 20, an exclusive consortium for Managed Service Providers (MSPs) aimed at dominating and revolutionizing the IT industry.

The perfect storm of 2020 has pushed the tech industry into uncharted territory. It’s one thing to ask, “What would happen if everyone started using my product?” It’s something entirely different when they actually do, though.

The world’s sudden shift to work from home has affected almost every aspect of the tech industry. Businesses need to account for security, scalability and ease of use more than they ever have for this transition. Technology has gone from vitally important to just plain vital.

Scalability

One of the most obvious issues when work from home started was how hard it pushed scalability questions. Your office server was theoretically fine, but now it needs to manage a heavier load than it ever has. Video and phone systems have been taxed as

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EV startup Faraday Future in talks to go public through SPAC merger

By Ben Klayman

DETROIT (Reuters) – Electric vehicle startup Faraday Future aims to close a deal soon to go public through a reverse merger with a special-purchase acquisition company (SPAC), its chief executive said on Monday.

“We are working on such a deal … and will be able to announce something hopefully quite soon,” Carsten Breitfeld said of the possibility of a SPAC deal.

Breitfeld declined to say who Faraday is negotiating with or when a deal would close.

A SPAC is a shell company that raises money through an initial public offering to buy an operating entity, typically within two years.

SPACs have emerged as a quick route to the stock market for companies, particularly auto technology startups, and have proven popular with investors seeking to echo Tesla Inc’s <TSLA.O> high stock valuation.

Breitfeld, who joined the Los Angeles-based company as CEO last year, also said the company would

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Trump is taking the latest in COVID-19 treatments. Here’s how those medicines work.

With 74-year-old President Trump and 50-year-old first lady Melania Trump testing positive for the coronavirus, what are the best proven treatments for them and other patients?



a man driving a car: A car with US President Trump drives past supporters in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020.


© Provided by Live Science
A car with US President Trump drives past supporters in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020.

We are both physician-scientists at the University of Virginia. We care for COVID-19 patients and conduct research to find better ways to diagnose and treat COVID-19.

Here we are sharing what physicians have learned over the past eight months treating various stages of this disease. Early in the year, there were few known treatments for people who showed severe COVID-19 symptoms apart from sustaining them on ventilators. Now, several months later, there are a handful of treatments, including drugs, that give doctors far better tools to heal patients, particularly very ill ones.

Who

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Fast-forwarding quantum calculations skips past the time limits imposed by decoherence, which plagues today’s machines — ScienceDaily

A new algorithm that fast forwards simulations could bring greater use ability to current and near-term quantum computers, opening the way for applications to run past strict time limits that hamper many quantum calculations.

“Quantum computers have a limited time to perform calculations before their useful quantum nature, which we call coherence, breaks down,” said Andrew Sornborger of the Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences division at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and senior author on a paper announcing the research. “With a new algorithm we have developed and tested, we will be able to fast forward quantum simulations to solve problems that were previously out of reach.”

Computers built of quantum components, known as qubits, can potentially solve extremely difficult problems that exceed the capabilities of even the most powerful modern supercomputers. Applications include faster analysis of large data sets, drug development, and unraveling the mysteries of superconductivity, to name a

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Early Humans Were Using Fire 300,000 Years Ago to Forge Superior Stone Tools

A stone tool made of flint.

A stone tool made of flint.
Image: Avraham Gopher

The prehistoric practice of using controlled fires to produce customized stone tools dates back 300,000 years, according to new research. The discovery affirms the cognitive and cultural sophistication of human species living at this time.

The baked flint tools, found at Qesem Cave in central Israel, are evidence that early hominins were capable of controlling the temperature of their fires and that they had stumbled upon an important survival skill, according to new research published today in Nature Human Behavior.

The heating of flint at low temperatures allowed for better control of flaking during knapping. Armed with this level of control, tool builders could cater their tools for specific cutting applications. The new paper was led by archaeologist Filipe Natalio from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel.

Silje Evjenth Bentsen, an anthropologist at the University of Bergen who

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Importance of moving activities outdoors and ensuring proper ventilation indoors stressed, as experts urge science community to clarify definitions — ScienceDaily

Scientists affiliated with leading research institutions across the U.S. state in a letter published Monday in the journal Science that researchers across disciplines must converge to deliver clear public health guidance about how SARS-CoV-2 is spread in the air.

The researchers write in the open letter that the scientific community must clarify the terminology used related to aerosols and droplets, and employ a more modern size threshold, rather than the existing one based on 1930s-era work. Authors include experts from the University of California San Diego, University of Maryland, Virginia Tech, and others.

Public health officials should make a clear distinction between droplets ejected by coughing or sneezing — which have inspired the social distancing mantra of six feet of separation between people — and aerosols that can carry the virus for much greater distances. Viruses in aerosols smaller than 100 microns can remain airborne in a confined space for

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SpaceX, L3Harris win Space Development Agency contracts to build missile-warning satellites

SDA Director Derek Tournear said SpaceX “came in with an extremely credible proposal” that leverages the Starlink assembly line

WASHINGTON — The Space Development Agency awarded SpaceX a $149 million contract and L3Harris a $193.5 million contract to each build four satellites to detect and track ballistic and hypersonic missiles.

The contracts announced Oct. 5 are for the first eight satellites of a potentially much larger Space Development Agency constellation of sensor satellites known as Tracking Layer Tranche 0. This is SpaceX’s first military contract to produce satellites. 

Both companies have to each deliver four satellites by September 2022, Space Development Agency Director Derek Tournear told SpaceNews.

Each satellite will have a “wide field of view” overhead persistent infrared (OPIR) sensor capable of detecting and tracking advanced missile threats from low Earth orbit. Each satellite also will have an optical crosslink so it can pass data to relay satellites. 

Tournear

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CEOs of 3 Tech Giants to Testify at Oct. 28 Senate Hearing | Washington, D.C. News

By MARCY GORDON, AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEOs of technology giants Facebook, Google and Twitter are expected to testify for an Oct. 28 Senate hearing on tech companies’ control over hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

The Senate Commerce Committee voted last week to authorize subpoenas for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai of Google and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey to force them to testify if they didn’t agree to do so voluntarily. Spokespeople for the companies said Monday that the CEOs will cooperate.

The hearing “must be constructive and focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections,” Twitter said in a tweet in its policy channel.

The hearing will come less than a week before Election Day. It marks a new bipartisan initiative against Big Tech companies, which have been under increasing scrutiny in Washington and from state

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NASA satellite’s dazzling panorama hides 74 exoplanets (and potentially hundreds more)

tess-north-hires-azeq-no-labels-medium

This panorama of the northern sky is composed of 208 images taken by TESS in the second year of its mission.


NASA/MIT/TESS and Ethan Kruse (USRA)

A series of 208 images captured by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) over one year reveal a dazzling sea of stars and 74 exoplanets in the northern sky, the space agency said in a release Monday. TESS has now imaged around 75% of the sky over two years. The planet-hunter wrapped up its second year of science operations in July. 

Astronomers are looking through another 1,200 exoplanet candidates to confirm whether new worlds exist there. More than half of those candidates are in the northern sky, NASA says.

TESS pinpoints planets by monitoring several stars simultaneously over large chunks of the sky and keeping watch for any

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