Coty Expands Kylie Skin Brand to Europe and Australia

Coty Inc.  (COTY) – Get Report said on Thursday that it was expanding its division for Kylie Jenner’s skincare products, Kylie Skin, to France, Germany, the U.K. and Australia.

The direct-to-consumer Kylieskin.com websites will ensure faster delivery of products. They’ll also enable customers to shop using their local languages and currencies, avoiding additional customs fees and duties, the New York beauty-products company said in a statement.

At last check Coty shares jumped 8% to $3.60.

“The launch of the Kylie Skin international websites also reinforces Coty’s strategic commitment to strengthening the direct-to-consumer business model,” said Simona Cattaneo, president of luxury brands at Coty. “We continue to see collections sell out quickly.” 

“I always wanted to bring my skincare line to more consumers around the world and this will allow for an easier shopping experience and faster delivery,” Jenner, a fashion designer and entrepreneur with a big social-media following,

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Quality control mechanism closes the protein production ‘on-ramps’ in cells

Quality control mechanism closes the protein production 'on-ramps'
An illustration of stalled ribosomes as stalled cars on a freeway. New work shows that factors GIGYF2 and 4EHP prevent translation from being initiated on problematic messenger RNA fragments. This is akin to closing an on-ramp to prevent additional traffic backups after an incident. Credit: Kamena Kostova and Navid Marvi.

Recent work led by Carnegie’s Kamena Kostova revealed a new quality control system in the protein production assembly line with possible implications for understanding neurogenerative disease.


The DNA that comprises the chromosomes housed in each cell’s nucleus encodes the recipes for how to make proteins, which are responsible for the majority of the physiological actions that sustain life. Individual recipes are transcribed using messenger RNA, which carries this piece of code to a piece of cellular machinery called the ribosome. The ribosome translates the message into amino acids—the building blocks of proteins.

But sometimes messages get garbled. The resulting incomplete

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Can the Red Raiders right the ship with an upset of No. 24 Iowa State?

Texas Tech at No. 24 Iowa State

When: 2:30 p.m. Saturday at MidAmerican Energy Field at Jack Trice Stadium

Records: Texas Tech (1-2 overall, 0-2 Big 12); Iowa State (2-1, 2-0 Big 12)

Last meeting: Iowa State defeated Texas Tech 34-24 on Oct. 19, 2019, in Lubbock, Tx.

TV: ABC

What’s at stake?

This may only be Texas Tech’s fourth game, but it likely will decide the fate of the season and, possibly, Matt Wells’ future in Lubbock. It sounds dramatic, but the Red Raiders need this upset in a bad way. Texas Tech is tied with Oklahoma for eighth place in the conference.

Since Matt Campbell took over in 2016 the Red Raiders are 0-4 against the Cyclones, including an embarrassing 66-10 loss by Patrick Mahomes and company in Campbell’s first year. That year’s Iowa State team finished the year 3-9.

When Texas Tech has the ball

After leaving

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The Best 4K TVs for Watching Movies in Crystal-Clear Definition





© Amazon


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As any film nerd will tell you, what TV you watch movies on matters. So if you’re going to pass on going to the movie theater, you’ll want to make sure you have a quality TV set at home that’s just as good. And you’ll definitely want one that can show 4K video content in all its glory.

When it comes to watching movies and TV shows in glorious full definition, a 4K TV is one of the best options because of its resolution. It’s superior to 1080p TVs in that its horizontal display resolution is about 4,000 pixels—about four times that of the former. The result is noticeable and will make films look much sharper.

But while all 4K TVs have a resolution quality in common, they’re not all the same. Depending on how much space you want to dedicate

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As Trump hails Regeneron treatment, his administration tries to block the science it used

President Donald Trump has been celebrating the dose of experimental monoclonal antibodies he was given last Friday, saying he thinks it helped him vanquish his coronavirus infection in record time.



a sign on the side of a building: A logo sign outside of the headquarters of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Tarrytown, New York on November 21, 2015. Photo by Kristoffer Tripplaar *** Please Use Credit from Credit Field ***


© Kristoffer Tripplaar/SIPA/Sipa USA/AP
A logo sign outside of the headquarters of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Tarrytown, New York on November 21, 2015. Photo by Kristoffer Tripplaar *** Please Use Credit from Credit Field ***

“It was incredible the impact it had,” he said in a video he tweeted Thursday.

What he didn’t say is that the treatment was developed using technology his administration has worked for four years to ban.

It has to do with abortion politics, and the science of using human tissue to test and to make medicines. Regeneron’s therapy indirectly relied on tissue taken from an abortion.

Trump’s base, of course, is strongly against abortion rights and his administration acted quickly to reverse many Obama

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Vaporized metal in the air of an exoplanet — ScienceDaily

WASP-121b is an exoplanet located 850 light years from Earth, orbiting its star in less than two days — a process that takes Earth a year to complete. WASP-121b is very close to its star — about 40 times closer than Earth to the Sun. This close proximity is also the main reason for its immensely high temperature of around 2,500 to 3,000 degrees Celsius. This makes it an ideal object of study to learn more about ultra-hot worlds.

Researchers led by Jens Hoeijmakers, first author of the study and postdoctoral research fellow at the National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS at the Universities of Bern and Geneva, examined data that had been collected by the high-resolution HARPS spectrograph. They were able to show that a total of at least seven gaseous metals occur in the atmosphere of WASP-121b. The results were recently published in the journal Astronomy &

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Materials Science and Engineering undergraduates earn prestigious scholarships

Zachary Wolff has always been interested in the STEM fields. In fact, in high school in his hometown of Las Vegas, Wolff spent four years studying biotechnology, an academic course that would indirectly lead him to his ultimate career choice.

“At the end of that, I found that I liked the technology part more than the bio part,” he explained.

With that self-realization, Wolff came to the University and dove into his studies in engineering.

“It was really a stroke of luck that I found material sciences and engineering,” he said. “I wanted to pick something interesting and challenging, and I loved it. I haven’t regretted it any semester so far.”

With single-minded focus, Wolff threw himself into his studies, combining a dedication in the classroom and laboratory with a drive to gain real-world experience through internships at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). For the NNSS, Wolff has performed

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The Real Problem Wasn’t Cambridge Analytica, But The Data Brokers That Outlived It

Cambridge Analytica, the disgraced and now closed political-consulting firm that got caught staging a heist of tens of millions of Facebook users’ data, now looks to be suffering a final indignity: being seen as not that special of a villain after all. 

Two days after the U.K. Information Commissioner’s Office released a lengthy report that found Cambridge Analytica’s work did not influence the Brexit referendum, one of that British firm’s foremost American critics argued that Cambridge’s death was meaningless because the underlying privacy problem remains very much alive. 

David Carroll, an associate professor of media design at The New School’s Parsons School of Design in New York, made this case by walking an online audience through his own Cambridge Analytica file—for which he pursued a

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arXiv now allows researchers to submit code with their manuscripts

Papers with Code today announced that preprint paper archive arXiv will now allow researchers to submit code alongside research papers, giving computer scientists an easy way to analyze, scrutinize, or reproduce claims of state-of-the-art AI or novel advances in what’s possible.

An assessment of the AI industry released a week ago found that only 15% of papers submitted by researchers today publish their code.

Maintained by Cornell University, arXiv hosts manuscripts from fields like biology, mathematics, and physics, and it has become one of the most popular places online for artificial intelligence researchers to publicly share their work. Preprint repositories give researchers a way to share their work immediately, before undergoing what can be a long peer review process as practiced by reputable scholarly journals. Code shared on arXiv will be submitted through Papers with Code and can be found in a Code tab for each paper.

“Having code on

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World’s fastest UV camera — ScienceDaily

The team of Professor Jinyang Liang, a specialist in ultrafast imaging at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), in collaboration with an international team of researchers, has developed the fastest camera in the world capable of recording photons in the ultraviolet (UV) range in real time. This original research is featured on the front cover of the 10th issue of the journal Laser & Photonics Reviews.

Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) captures the entire process in real time and unparalleled resolution with just one click. The spatial and temporal information is first compressed into an image and then, using a reconstruction algorithm, it is converted into a video.

Developing a Compact Instrument for UV

Until now, this technique was limited to visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and thus to a specific category of physical events. “Many phenomena that occur on very short time scales also take place on a very

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