Kamchatka Marine Life Death Caused By Algae: Russian Scientist

The mass death of sea creatures in Russia’s Kamchatka region was caused by toxins from microalgae rather than man-made pollution, a senior Russian scientist said on Monday, citing preliminary findings of an investigation.

Locals on the volcanic peninsula in the Pacific raised the alarm in September as surfers experienced stinging eyes and sea creatures, including octopuses, seals and sea urchins, were found dead on the shore.

Scientists suggested that up to 95 percent of marine life living along the seabed in the affected area had died.

Conservation activists had raised concern that the source of the pollution could be a Soviet era storage ground for poisonous chemicals on Kamchatka that might have seeped out into the sea.

“I am sure that we are facing a large-scale phenomenon, but not an uncommon one for Kamchatka, called harmful blooming algae,” the vice president of Russia’s Academy of Sciences, Andrei Adrianov, told journalists

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Death of the HQ? Pandemic hits commercial real estate, but long-term trends still open to debate

A rendering of one of Amazon’s new buildings in Bellevue, Wash. (Vulcan Image)

“HQ’s are finished.”

That was the hot take this week from Chris Herd, founder and CEO of remote work setup startup Firstbase. After speaking with about 1,000 companies over the past six months, he estimates that many will be cutting their office space by as much as 40% to 60%. About 90% of workforces indicated that they “never want to be in an office again full-time,” he wrote.

The latest example of the trend is the news this morning that working from home will be a permanent part of the mix at Microsoft. Boosting access to talent, reducing costs, and quality of life were among the benefits of remote work cited by companies in Herd’s informal survey.

“Good thread on the future of work. I agree with him,” former Zillow Group CEO Spencer Rascoff chimed in

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Tech worker pleads guilty in death of Utah college student

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FILE – In this July 1, 2019, file photo, Ashley Fine speaks during a vigil for Mackenzie Lueck at the university in Salt Lake City. A tech worker pleaded guilty Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, in the death of Lueck, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ayoola A. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

AP

A tech worker pleaded guilty on Wednesday to strangling a Utah college student whose disappearance over a year ago sparked a search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard.

Ayoola A. Ajayi acknowledged he planned the death of 23-year-old Mackenzie Lueck, whom he met on a dating app and arranged to meet in a park. After they returned to his

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Hippo Attacks, Drags Child To Death Before Horrified Onlookers, Incident Caught On Camera

In a horrific incident, a massive hippopotamus attacked and dragged a child to his death in Kenya. The incident reportedly took place in the Lake Victoria region.

The child, whose age was not revealed, was playing close to the shore in Mbita when suddenly he was grabbed by the hippo. People who were washing clothes nearby watched the child being dragged into the murky water.

A video shared online shows the child submerging in the water as locals cried out and pelted rocks at the animal in an attempt to save him. By the time the animal let go of the young boy he had already died. The body of the boy was later found with serious injuries.

The video was filmed on Sept. 16 but it was shared online recently, according to U.K.’s the Sun. 

Kenya Wildlife Service reportedly said that attacks by hippos and crocodiles have increased sharply

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Scientists detect ‘mass death’ of sea life off Russia’s Kamchatka

A Greenpeace handout photo showing the area off Khalaktyr beach on the Kamchatka peninsula that may have been contaminated with
A Greenpeace handout photo showing the area off Khalaktyr beach on the Kamchatka peninsula that may have been contaminated with toxic chemicals

Pollution off the Pacific shoreline of the remote Kamchatka peninsula has caused the mass death of marine creatures, Russian scientists said Tuesday.


Locals sounded the alarm in late September as surfers experienced stinging eyes from the water and sea creatures including seals, octopuses and sea urchins washed up dead on the shore.

Coming on the heels of a massive oil leak in Siberia, the latest incident has sparked a large-scale investigation with fears that poisonous substances in underground storage since the Soviet era could have leaked into the water.

A team of divers from a state nature reserve found a “mass death” of sea life at a depth of five to 10 metres (16-33 feet), Ivan Usatov of the Kronotsky Reserve said, adding that “95 percent are dead.”

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Woman Heard on Camera Begging Assailant Not to Harm Her Is Found Beaten to Death, Man Arrested

South Salt Lake Police Department Kaitlyn Barron

Her plaintive cries pierced the night, as she screamed, “Please don’t rape me!”

It was only after the sun came up that the partially clothed body of the young woman who spent her last moments begging for her life was found crumpled in a parking lot in Salt Lake, Utah.

On Sept. 28, police in South Salt Lake were called to a back parking lot at 2550 South 300 West in South Salt Lake City, Utah, about a report of a deceased, partially clothed female, the department says in a statement.

The woman has been identified as Kaitlyn Barron, 23, of San Antonio, Texas, The Salt Lake Tribune reports.

Barron “had been severely beaten” and was an “obvious victim to a homicide,” the statement says.

She was also the “potential victim of rape,” according to a probable cause statement, Fox 13 Now reports.

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Acute kidney injury linked to higher rate of death within three months of intracerebral hemorrhage — ScienceDaily

Patients who suffer an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) face an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) during their hospitalization. AKI can lead to sudden kidney failure, kidney damage or even death. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care have determined which ICH patients are at the highest risk for this kidney injury so doctors can take precautions to prevent it. They also examined how the commonly-used blood pressure lowering drug nicardipine contributes to AKI.

“Over the past five years, clinicians have been concerned about AKI as they see patients who present with ICH, then develop kidney failure and require dialysis,” said lead researcher Adnan I. Qureshi, MD, a professor of clinical neurology at the MU School of Medicine. “What we need is a more global body approach to improve the outcome of patients with ICH, rather than just focusing on the brain.”

Qureshi’s team

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Twitter Bans Trump Death Wishes, Sparks Debate

Twitter is removing tweets hoping for the demise of US President Donald Trump — a move which opened up the social platform to criticism that it should enforce the same policy for everyone.

San Francisco-based Twitter drew a line on caustic commentary after Trump’s Covid-19 hospitalization Friday, telling users that expressing hope for the death of anyone violates policies against abusive behavior at the one-to-many messaging service.

“Tweets that wish or hope for death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease against anyone are not allowed and will need to be removed,” Twitter said in a post.

Attached was a link to a Twitter policy page that said it does not tolerate content that wishes, hopes, or expresses desire for someone to die or contract a fatal disease.

The post sparked a firestorm of responses from people contending that Twitter has not been consistent about enforcing those rules.

“So… you mean

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Wishing Trump’s death from COVID-19 not allowed on Facebook, Twitter

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President Trump’s Twitter page.


Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

As news of President Donald Trump’s positive COVID-19 diagnosis spread, social media companies warned their users that content wishing for the president to die won’t be allowed on their platforms.

After the president revealed on Thursday that he and first lad Melania Trump had tested positive for the virus, many people took to social media to wish him a speedy recovery, but many others said they hoped for the opposite outcome.

A Facebook spokesperson Friday such post violate the social media giant’s user policies and will be removed.

“To be clear, Facebook is removing death threats or content targeted directly at the president that wishes him death, including comments on his posts or his page – in addition

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Reptile dubbed ‘Jaws of Death’ terrorized Cretaceous seas

By Will Dunham

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Roughly 80 million years ago in the shallow inland sea that once split North America into eastern and western land masses, a fearsome 33-foot-long (10-meter-long) marine reptile with powerful jaws and tremendous bite-force was one of the apex predators.

A type of seagoing lizard called a mosasaur that ruled the oceans at the same time dinosaurs dominated the land, it has now been given a name meaning “Jaws of Death.”

A new analysis published on Wednesday of fossils of the creature unearthed in 1975 has determined that it deserves to be recognized as a new genus of mosasaur based on skeletal traits including a unique combination of features in the tooth-bearing bones and the shape of an important bone in the jaw joint.

Its remains were discovered near Cedaredge, Colorado.

This Cretaceous Period creature previously had been classified as the species Prognathodon stadtmani. Because

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