New clues about the link between stress and depression — ScienceDaily

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein in the brain that is important both for the function of the mood-regulating substance serotonin and for the release of stress hormones, at least in mice. The findings, which are published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, may have implications for the development of new drugs for depression and anxiety.

After experiencing trauma or severe stress, some people develop an abnormal stress response or chronic stress. This increases the risk of developing other diseases such as depression and anxiety, but it remains unknown what mechanisms are behind it or how the stress response is regulated.

The research group at Karolinska Institutet has previously shown that a protein called p11 plays an important role in the function of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain that regulates mood. Depressed patients and suicide victims have lower levels of the p11 protein in their

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Participants in an eight-week mindfulness-based stress reduction course reported significant improvement in levels of pain, depression and disability — ScienceDaily

A mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course was found to benefit patients with chronic pain and depression, leading to significant improvement in participant perceptions of pain, mood and functional capacity, according to a study in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Most of the study respondents (89%) reported the program helped them find ways to better cope with their pain while 11% remained neutral.

Chronic pain is a common and serious medical condition affecting an estimated 100 million people in the United States, which correlates with annual costs of approximately $635 billion. The small-scale study was conducted in a semi-rural population in Oregon where issues of affordability, addiction and access to care are common. Participants received intensive instruction in mindfulness meditation and mindful hatha yoga during an eight-week period.

“Many people have lost hope because, in most cases, chronic pain will never fully resolve,” says Cynthia Marske, DO, an

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Social media use linked with depression, secondary trauma during COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

Can’t stop checking social media for the latest COVID-19 health information? You might want to take a break, according to researchers at Penn State and Jinan University who discovered that excessive use of social media for COVID-19 health information is related to both depression and secondary trauma.

“We found that social media use was rewarding up to a point, as it provided informational, emotional and peer support related to COVID-19 health topics,” said Bu Zhong, associate professor of journalism, Penn State. “However, excessive use of social media led to mental health issues. The results imply that taking a social media break may promote well-being during the pandemic, which is crucial to mitigating mental health harm inflicted by the pandemic.”

The study, which published online on Aug. 15 in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, included 320 participants living in urban districts of Wuhan, China. In February 2020, the team

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New evidence CBT can help treat sleep, depression cycle — ScienceDaily

Insomnia causing sleepless nights, daytime fatigue and poor health outcomes is a cycle worth busting, experts say, with depression, anxiety and stress a common co-occurrence.

A study of more than 450 insomnia patients in Australia has confirmed some positive results for such patients with insomnia.

The Flinders University researchers found not only that a program of targeted cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia help relieve insomnia — but also has a positive effect on symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress.

“With COVID-19 and many other stressors in life, treating the worst effects of insomnia may have a transformative effect on a person’s wellbeing, mental health and lifestyle,” says lead researcher Dr Alexander Sweetman, from Flinders University’s sleep research clinic, the Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health.

“We studied the impact of depression, anxiety, and stress on response to CBTi, in 455 ‘real world’ insomnia patients, from pre-treatment to three-month follow-up,” Dr Sweetman

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As coronavirus skyrocketed in the US, so did stress and depression

As the Covid-19 pandemic got worse in the United States, so, too, did levels of stress and depression, according to a new report.



a man and a woman in a car: A medical professional administers a Covid-19 test at a free testing site at the Endicott Estate in Dedham, Massachusetts on September 14, 2020. Fallon Ambulance is conducting the testing during the continuing coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)


© Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe/Getty Images
A medical professional administers a Covid-19 test at a free testing site at the Endicott Estate in Dedham, Massachusetts on September 14, 2020. Fallon Ambulance is conducting the testing during the continuing coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Since the virus broke out in the US more than six months ago, cases have climbed to more than 6.7 million and 199,259 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Although many states have begun reopening, many facets of everyday life including work, school and socializing are still being drastically disrupted by coronavirus. And as the pandemic goes on, many people are experiencing more stress and depression, researchers reported in the journal Science Advances Friday.

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