An international team of researchers developed a novel technique to produce precise, high-performing biometric sensors — ScienceDaily

Wearable sensors are evolving from watches and electrodes to bendable devices that provide far more precise biometric measurements and comfort for users. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the evolution one step further by printing sensors directly on human skin without the use of heat.

Led by Huanyu “Larry” Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, the team published their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

“In this article, we report a simple yet universally applicable fabrication technique with the use of a novel sintering aid layer to enable direct printing for on-body sensors,” said first author Ling Zhang, a researcher in the Harbin Institute of Technology in China and in Cheng’s laboratory.

Cheng and his colleagues previously developed flexible printed circuit boards for use in wearable sensors, but printing directly on skin has been hindered by

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Novel Therapeutic Technology Developed and Manufactured by ADM Tronics for Origin, Inc., …

Northvale, NJ, Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — via NewMediaWire  — ADM Tronics Unlimited, Inc. (OTCQB: ADMT) has been advised that Origin, Inc. filed an Investigational Device Exemption (“IDE”) application with the FDA to conduct clinical studies to treat patients diagnosed with COVID-19 with its plasma-generated nitric oxide (“NO”) technology.  ADMT has been developing and has manufactured for Origin, Inc. the IonoJet™, which allows for targeted delivery of NO generated by a thermal plasma, produced from room air at the point of therapy.

Michael Preston, Chairman and President of Origin, Inc., stated, “Like other nitric oxide companies, we have recognized the potential ability of NO to stop the replication of corona viruses. We believe there may be limitations with other approaches, and we have worked to address these in a novel system that is designed to allow NO to be administered effectively. ADMT has been key to our development and

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New method developed to help scientists understand how the brain processes color — ScienceDaily

Through the development of new technology, University of Minnesota researchers have developed a method that allows scientists to understand how a fruit fly’s brain responds to seeing color. Prior to this, being able to determine how a brain responds to color was limited to humans and animals with slower visual systems. A fruit fly, when compared to a human, has a visual system that is five times faster. Some predatory insects see ten times faster than humans.

“If we can understand how seeing color affects the brain, we will be able to better understand how different animals react to certain stimuli,” said Trevor Wardill, the study’s lead author and assistant professor in the College of Biological Sciences. “In doing so, we will know what interests them most, how it impacts their behavior, and what advantages different color sensitivities may give to an individual’s or a species’ survival.”

Published in Scientific

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Researchers have developed an eco-friendly zero-cement concrete, which all but eliminates corrosion — ScienceDaily

Researchers from RMIT University have developed an eco-friendly zero-cement concrete, which all but eliminates corrosion.

Concrete corrosion and fatbergs plague sewage systems around the world, leading to costly and disruptive maintenance.

But now RMIT engineers have developed concrete that can withstand the corrosive acidic environment found in sewage pipes, while greatly reducing residual lime that leaches out, contributing to fatbergs.

Fatbergs are gross globs of congealed mass clogging sewers with fat, grease, oil and non-biodegradable junk like wet wipes and nappies, some growing to be 200 metres long and weighing tonnes.

Billion-dollar savings

These build-ups of fat, oil and grease in sewers and pipelines, as well as general corrosion over time, costs billions in repairs and replacement pipes.

The RMIT researchers, led by Dr Rajeev Roychand, created a concrete that eliminates free lime — a chemical compound that promotes corrosion and fatbergs.

Roychand said the solution is more durable than

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The Hologram AR Function Developed by Microsoft, Google, Apple, and WIMI Pave the way for Smart Wearable Device – Press Release

HONG KONG, Sept. 28, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Many big tech companies are now developing smart glasses and AR helmets, hoping that they can replace smartphones one day. Microsoft, Google, and Apple all have their own products. If smart glasses can really replace phones and computers, it will certainly be a huge market.

Google

When Google Glass came out, it was said to have attracted lots of attention. The global attention of science and technology was focused on Google Glass; however, the first battle of Google Glass should be regarded as a failure. Google has launched a new version of business Google Glass, adding a lot of AR programs. The map part of the glass is more user-friendly, since it shows the specific route of the map in the glasses, and the parameters of other behaviors can also be seen.

Apple

Instead of glasses, Apple introduced a helmet. Apple plans

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Researchers developed a smart suit that is wirelessly powered by a smartphone

Researchers from NUS have developed a smartphone-powered suit that is capable of providing athletes with physiological data, including information on their posture, running gait, and body temperature while they are performing. The team says athletes are always looking for new ways to push human performance and to be able to improve the need to know their current limits objectively so they can overcome them. Current ways that athletes can track performance include wearables, such as the Apple Watch or Fitbit.

Better performing systems are available, but typically include tangles of wire and are too bulky to be used outdoors. The researchers sat about developing a system optimized for collecting data on athletes in the outdoor environment during performance using multiple sensors at different points on the body. One major goal was to reduce the system’s bulk, weight, and wires to an absolute minimum.

The researchers came up with a wearable

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The long-awaited photonic technique could change the way optical technologies are developed and used over the next decade — ScienceDaily

The colloidal diamond has been a dream of researchers since the 1990s. These structures — stable, self-assembled formations of miniscule materials — have the potential to make light waves as useful as electrons in computing, and hold promise for a host of other applications. But while the idea of colloidal diamonds was developed decades ago, no one was able to reliably produce the structures. Until now.

Researchers led by David Pine, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and professor of physics at NYU, have devised a new process for the reliable self-assembly of colloids in a diamond formation that could lead to cheap, scalable fabrication of such structures. The discovery, detailed in “Colloidal Diamond,” appearing in the September 24 issue of Nature, could open the door to highly efficient optical circuits leading to advances in optical computers and lasers, light filters that

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