Spotify Developing iOS 14 Widgets in Latest Beta

One of the big new features of iOS 14 is Home Screen widgets, which provide information from apps at a glance. The ‌widgets‌ can be pinned to the ‌Home Screen‌ in various spots and sizes, allowing for many different layouts.

Image credit: Reddit user AustinMauritz

Many third-party apps have released ‌widgets‌, and now evidence that Spotify is developing its own official widget has appeared in a TestFlight beta.

The widget is currently available in small and medium sizes, with the former designed to display the artwork of the last played artist, song, or album, while the latter size shows four of the same content elements.

Unfortunately there are no play, pause, or next song buttons, since Apple only allows ‌widgets‌ to present read-only information, with interactive elements such as scrolling elements or switches not allowed, presumably due to battery life considerations.

Image credit: Reddit user Lupolo

Instead, both ‌widgets‌ include

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Army’s ground combat center is developing new methods, formations for the next war

The focus of the Army is ground combat and the way the Army fights is through fire and maneuver.

So, it makes sense that the job of figuring out where technological advances, doctrine and tactics meet would be at the epicenter of innovations in ground combat — the Maneuver Center of Excellence in Columbus, Ga.

To see how the center brings those ideas together in a fast-changing force, Army Times talked with Maj. Gen. Patrick Donahoe, commander of MCOE, ahead of this year’s virtual Association of the U.S. Army Annual Meeting and Exposition, which begins Oct. 13.

While tech gets the headlines and cool videos, it’s how that technology is implemented by the service that makes the difference, Donahoe argued.

Some of that can produce fairly large-scale changes, and so soldiers are likely to see a rethinking of formations, such as the brigade combat team, that have been around for

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Low cost and ease of manufacturing allow for wide application in developing countries — ScienceDaily

Electrical engineers, computer scientists and biomedical engineers at the University of California, Irvine have created a new lab-on-a-chip that can help study tumor heterogeneity to reduce resistance to cancer therapies.

In a paper published today in Advanced Biosystems, the researchers describe how they combined artificial intelligence, microfluidics and nanoparticle inkjet printing in a device that enables the examination and differentiation of cancers and healthy tissues at the single-cell level.

“Cancer cell and tumor heterogeneity can lead to increased therapeutic resistance and inconsistent outcomes for different patients,” said lead author Kushal Joshi, a former UCI graduate student in biomedical engineering. The team’s novel biochip addresses this problem by allowing precise characterization of a variety of cancer cells from a sample.

“Single-cell analysis is essential to identify and classify cancer types and study cellular heterogeneity. It’s necessary to understand tumor initiation, progression and metastasis in order to design better cancer treatment

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Future dogs: Army developing augmented reality goggles that receive commands from soldiers – News

Future dogs: Army developing augmented reality goggles that receive commands from soldiers

Hed: Future dogs: Army developing augmented reality goggles that receive commands from soldiers

The Army is developing high-tech augmented reality goggles for dogs that eventually could allow handlers to give them directions from afar, the service said.

Military working dogs are directed via hand signals, speaking or laser pointers, which require the handler to remain close by. That can potentially endanger soldiers on missions that involve finding explosives and hazardous materials, or assisting in rescue operations, the Army statement said Tuesday.

The goggles developed by the Army and the Seattle-based company Command Sight show dogs where to go using a simulated laser pointer.

Initial feedback indicates “the system could fundamentally change how military canines are deployed in the future,” said A.J. Peper, the founder of Command Sight, as quoted in the Army’s statement.

Peper founded his company in

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Semi-retired tech innovator cites helping others, developing WiFi among his accomplishments

Rob La Gesse’s resume reads like a Hollywood script.

Navy veteran. Mayor. Wi-Fi development team member. Author.

A man of many talents, La Gesse credits his accomplishments to working with great leaders and innovators of technology. That, and caring about others around him.

“My life, from being a medic to a vice president in a publicly-traded company, has been about how I can empower other people,” La Gesse, 59, said. “I call it compassionate leadership. Everything that happened to me happened because I was nice to someone.”

He grew up in Papineau, Illinois, one of six boys. At 16, his family moved to Corpus Christi. He said it was a memorable trip because they drove through traffic-jammed streets of Memphis on the day of Elvis Presley’s funeral.

College wasn’t a financial option. In 1979, after La Gesse graduated from Mary Carroll High School, he enlisted in the Navy.

La Gesse

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Addresses major testing need in developing world; also in US, where reagent supplies are again dwindling — ScienceDaily

A major roadblock to large scale testing for coronavirus infection in the developing world is a shortage of key chemicals, or reagents, needed for the test, specifically the ones used to extract the virus’s genetic material, or RNA.

A team of scientists at the University of Vermont, working in partnership with a group at the University of Washington, has developed a method of testing for the COVID-19 virus that doesn’t make use of these chemicals but still delivers an accurate result, paving the way for inexpensive, widely available testing in both developing countries and industrialized nations like the United States, where reagent supplies are again in short supply.

The method for the test, published Oct. 2 in PLOS Biology, omits the step in the widely used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test where the scarce reagents are needed.

92% accuracy, missing only lowest viral loads

The accuracy of

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Key control mechanism allows cells to form tissues and anatomical structures in the developing embryo

Sticking together
Determination of neural progenitor cell-cell de-adhesion forces using micropipette aspiration. Credit: IST Austria

Under a microscope, the first few hours of every multicellular organism’s life seem incongruously chaotic. After fertilization, a once tranquil single-celled egg divides again and again, quickly becoming a visually tumultuous mosh pit of cells jockeying for position inside the rapidly growing embryo.


Yet, amid this apparent pandemonium, cells begin to self-organize. Soon, spatial patterns emerge, serving as the foundation for the construction of tissues, organs and elaborate anatomical structures from brains to toes and everything in between. For decades, scientists have intensively studied this process, called morphogenesis, but it remains in many ways enigmatic.

Now, researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria have discovered a key control mechanism that cells use to self-organize in early embryonic development. The findings, published in Science on Oct. 2, shed light on a

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Genetic risk of developing obesity is driven by variants that affect the brain — ScienceDaily

Over the past decade, scientists have identified hundreds of different genetic variants that increase a person’s risk of developing obesity. But a lot of work remains to understand how these variants translate into obesity. Now scientists at the University of Copenhagen have identified populations of cells in the body that play a role in the development of the disease — and they are all in the brain.

“Our results provide evidence that biological processes outside the traditional organs investigated in obesity research, such as fat cells, play a key role in human obesity,” says Associate Professor Tune H Pers from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research (CBMR), at the University of Copenhagen, who published his team’s findings in the internationally-recognized journal eLife.

“We identified cell types in the brain that regulate memory, behavior and processing of sensory information that are involved in the development of the

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Findings point the way to developing a broad-spectrum flu drug — ScienceDaily

Researchers have identified two antibodies that protect mice against lethal infections of influenza B virus, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Together with an antibody that targets the other major kind of influenza viruses that infect people — influenza A — these antibodies potentially could form the basis of a broad-spectrum flu drug that could treat almost all flu cases.

The findings are published Sep. 24 in the journal Immunity.

“People forget that before COVID-19 hit last winter, we were already in the midst of a really bad influenza season, especially for children,” said co-senior author Ali Ellebedy, PhD, an assistant professor of pathology and immunology at Washington University. “Last year, influenza B viruses attacked much earlier in the season than usual and resulted in significant illness and death among children. We really need better treatments

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Soccer ball brings energy to developing world

(CBS News) The sOccket looks like an ordinary soccer ball, but it’s much more than that. It’s a power source for small electronic devices — something the developing world desperately needs.

The innovative ball is the brainchild of Harvard graduates Julia C. Silverman and Jessica O. Matthews, who came up with the idea while taking an engineering class for non-engineers. The class’ intent was to use art in science to bring change.

Both Silverman and Matthews have backgrounds with developing countries and used the stories of those areas in generating their idea. “Everybody (in the areas we wanted to target) had this strong love of soccer,” Silverman said. “But almost nobody has consistent access to electricity.”

How does the device work?

It harnesses kinetic energy using a stripped-down gyroscope inside the ball that’s rolling as the ball is rolling. The gyroscope harnesses the kinetic energy generated during play and stores

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