Trump gives overview of COVID-19 case in first on-camera interview since diagnosis

President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Nine people who attended Trump rally in Minnesota contracted coronavirus Schiff: If Trump wanted more infections ‘would he be doing anything different?’ MORE on Friday participated in his first on-camera interview since testing positive for COVID-19, during which he admitted that he remained hospitalized for observation after scans showed some congestion in his lungs and touted the benefits of his early treatment.

The president offered a rosy outlook of his path forward in a pre-recorded interview with Fox News medical contributor Marc Siegel. Trump spoke to Siegel from the Rose Garden, while the doctor was based in a network studio.

Trump insisted that he was feeling well and that he had been “medication free” since earlier in the day. But he acknowledged that he experienced fatigue and could have faced a more dire

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Trump to appear on ‘Tucker Carlson Tonight’ in first on-camera interview after COVID-19 diagnosis

President Trump is scheduled to make his first on-camera interview appearance on Friday since he announced last week that he tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

The interview will take place on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” at 8 p.m. ET. Dr. Marc Siegel will conduct a medical evaluation and interview during the program.

The public has largely received information about the president’s condition from his daily tweets and updates from his medical team.

TRUMP CAN RETURN TO ‘PUBLIC ENGAGEMENTS’ THIS WEEKEND, WHITE HOUSE PHYSICIAN SAYS

President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

During a phone interview on “Hannity” Thursday, the president said he was doing “really good,” and that he would probably be tested again for the virus on Friday.

White House physician Sean Conley 

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Fox News medical contributor to conduct first Trump on-camera interview since COVID-19 diagnosis

A Fox News medical contributor will interview President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign raises over M on day of VP debate Trump chastises Whitmer for calling him ‘complicit’ in extremism associated with kidnapping scheme Trump says he hopes to hold rally Saturday despite recent COVID-19 diagnosis MORE on camera Friday night for the first time since the president tested positive for COVID-19 last week.

Marc Siegel will conduct the interview remotely from New York, with Trump participating from the White House, Fox News said.

“[Trump] will discuss his current condition as well as his experience,” Fox News said in a statement Friday.

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The interview will air on “Tucker CarlsonTucker CarlsonFox News Media signs three-book deal with HarperCollins in launch of publishing platform Fox News tops broadcast networks for first time in 3rd quarter Will Chis Wallace’s debate topics favor Biden over Trump? MORE Tonight” at 8 p.m.

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Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis sparks hostile Twitter reaction against Asians

For example, in one since-deleted tweet to her 394,000 followers, pro-Trump former congressional candidate DeAnna Lorraine said that “China must pay for giving Trump COVID,” and swore that “we will have justice.”

Another Twitter user with 114,000 followers blamed Chinese President Xi Jinping for trying to assassinate Trump.

The anti-China rhetoric used by the Trump administration and its supporters throughout the pandemic has left Asian Americans vulnerable to racist attacks, researchers have previously found. Fear, hatred and misinformation online has led to verbal assaults, boycotts of Asian businesses and sometimes violence. A coalition of Asian American groups, along with San Francisco State University, reported this summer that 2,120 hate incidents against Asian Americans have taken place since March.

President Trump has been at the forefront of pushing a narrative that responsibility for the virus lies with China. In the first presidential debate on Sept. 29, Trump said the covid-19 crisis

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Study: New bedside test means faster diagnosis, treatment of COVID-19

Oct. 8 (UPI) — A rapid, bedside test for COVID-19 delivers results in less than two hours, meaning that appropriate treatment can be initiated earlier for those already hospitalized because of their symptoms, according to a study published Thursday by The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

The standard COVID-19 test uses polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, technology, which amplifies small samples of DNA in order to identify the presence of virus in samples taken from an infected person’s nose or throat.

The PCR test requires samples to be sent to a centralized lab within the hospital for processing, typically takes more than 20 hours to produce results, the researchers said.

The enhanced speed of the bedside, or “point-of-care” tests, also means patients infected with the new coronavirus can be isolated earlier, reducing the risk for transmission to other patients and healthcare workers.

“Our findings are the first to suggest the clinical benefits

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The Technology 202: Twitter’s response to Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis highlights inconsistencies in company’s handling of abuse

From Democratic Reps. Rashida Tlaib (Mich.) and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.):

Reps. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) and Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) also responded to the company’s tweet.

Twitter on Saturday said it would do better:

The episode highlighted the broader issue of social media abuse directed at female politicians particularly from minority backgrounds. 

Female congresswomen are far more likely than their male counterparts to be targeted with abusive posts on Facebook and Twitter, according to a new analysis from the Institute for Strategic Dialogue shared exclusively with The Technology 202. And the research shows that Ocasio-Cortez and Omar received the highest proportion of abusive comments. 

The findings are particularly important in the final weeks of a contentious presidential election, where a Black and Asian American woman is for the first time on the presidential ticket. They’re also a reminder that vice presidential candidate and Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.) is particularly vulnerable

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Trump’s diagnosis fuels uncertainty for skittish U.S. stock market

(Reuters) – Investors are gauging how a potential deterioration in President Donald Trump’s health could impact asset prices in coming weeks, as the U.S. leader remains hospitalized after being diagnosed with COVID-19.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he “will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days” after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

So far, markets have been comparatively sanguine: hopes of a breakthrough in talks among U.S. lawmakers on another stimulus package took the edge off a stock market selloff on Friday, with the S&P 500 losing less than 1% and so-called safe-haven assets seeing

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Trump’s diagnosis a reminder US cases on rise

SEATTLE — The news of President Donald Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis serves as a reminder of the pervasive spread of the coronavirus in the United States.



FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2020, file photo, a man wearing a face mask walks past a mural in South Central Los Angeles. President Donald Trump’s startling COVID-19 diagnosis serves as a cruel reminder of the pervasive spread of the coronavirus in the United States and shows how tenuous of a grip the nation has on the crisis, health experts said. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Oct. 1, 2020, file photo, a man wearing a face mask walks past a mural in South Central Los Angeles. President Donald Trump’s startling COVID-19 diagnosis serves as a cruel reminder of the pervasive spread of the coronavirus in the United States and shows how tenuous of a grip the nation has on the crisis, health experts said. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

U.S. infections have been rising for several weeks, a worrying sign with colder weather approaching. The response to the crisis rests largely with governors, which has meant a patchwork of approaches. Only a handful of countries rank higher in COVID-19 deaths per capita.



FILE - In this July 3, 2020 file photo, Lebanese interior minister Mohammed Fahmi, right, meets with Sunni clerics representing anti-government protesters gathered outside his office in Beirut, Lebanon.  Authorities  on Friday, Oct. 2,  ordered the lockdown of more than 100 towns and villages across Lebanon after hundreds of people tested positive for the coronavirus in recent days and amid a shortage of hospital beds. Fahmi said in a statement the complete lockdown of 111 towns and villages will go into effect Sunday morning and last until Oct. 12.   (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this July

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Misinformation spikes as Trump confirms COVID-19 diagnosis

CHICAGO (AP) — News Friday that President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 sparked an explosion of rumors, misinformation and conspiracy theories that in a matter of hours littered the social media feeds of many Americans.

Tweets shared thousands of times claimed Democrats might have somehow intentionally infected the president with the coronavirus during the debates. Others speculated in Facebook posts that maybe the president was faking his illness. And the news also ignited constant conjecture among QAnon followers, who peddle a baseless belief that Trump is a warrior against a secret network of government officials and celebrities that they falsely claim is running a child trafficking ring.

In the final weeks of the presidential campaign, Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis was swept into an online vortex of coronavirus misinformation and the falsehoods swirling around this polarizing election. Trump himself has driven much of that confusion

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The Technology 202: Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis sparks onslaught of online misinformation

“It’s as if a nuclear information bomb exploded on social media,” says Watts, a longtime researcher of influence operations, who is already starting to track and log various conspiracy theories related to the news. 

“Make no mistake — regardless of your politics — the President and first lady contracting covid-19 is a significant national crisis compounding on the pandemic that has taken over 200,000 Americans,” said Graham Brookie, the director and managing editor of the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Lab. “We’re going to see a lot misinformation — and disinformation — about this in the coming days and weeks.” 

Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis could be an ideal target for foreign adversaries seeking to sow discord among the American public. 

“Any time the President of the United States is at risk is an opportunity to foreign adversaries,” Brookie told me. “It’s why the United States has contingency and continuity plans in place

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