This Is the Healthiest Possible Diet, According to Research

If you’re an entrepreneur who wants to maximize your energy and avoid an early death by eating healthy, there is a lot of confusing advice out there to contend with. Besides a host of trendy but conflicting diets, guidelines from actual scientists change regularly. 

One year fat will kill you, the next sugar is public enemy number one. Is fish great for you or mercury-laced poison? And while everyone agrees heavy drinking is unhealthy, does a glass or two of wine a day do good or bad things for your health? 

Given the ever-changing answers to questions like these, it’s tempting to throw up your hands and ignore everything but the most basic nutrition advice. If no one knows anything beyond fast food is bad, then you may as well let your instincts (and taste buds) guide you. 

But according to a research review published recently in the Journal of

Read More

Diet of pre-Columbian societies in the Brazilian Amazon reconstructed

Diet of pre-Columbian societies in the Brazilian Amazon reconstructed
Human burial with incised ceramic at the archaeological site of Bacanga at Sao Luas Island. Credit: André Colonese

An international study led by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA-UAB) and the Department of Prehistory at the UAB has reconstructed the diets of pre-Columbian groups on the Amazon coast of Brazil, showing that tropical agroforestry was regionally variable.


During the past few decades, there has been an increased interest in the origin and evolution of pre-Columbian economies in the Amazon. However, the paucity of human remains from this period has limited our understanding of the contribution of plants, terrestrial animals and fish to individual diets and, therefore, their role in supporting population growth and cultural changes in this region before European contact.

This new study, published in Scientific Reports, used stable isotopic analysis and Bayesian Mixing Models to reconstruct the diets of human individuals living along the Brazilian

Read More

What a diet of the future might look like

seaweed
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

At a time when food production is one of the biggest climate culprits, it is essential that we seek out new food sources which can nourish us and, at the same time, not overburden the planet.


More and more people are opting to become vegetarians or, even more radically, vegans.

However, the large majority of people find it difficult to entirely shelve meat in the name of preventing climate change, according to Professor Ole G. Mouritsen of the University of Copenhagen’s Department of Food Science.

“Many people simply crave the umami flavor that is, for example, found in meat. Therefore, it may be more realistic to consider a flexitarian diet, where one consumes small quantities of animal products, such as meat, eggs and milk, alongside vegetables. However, one can also begin thinking about alternatives to the juicy steak—of which there are many,” he says.

In a

Read More

Association between screen time use, diet and other health factors — ScienceDaily

The era of the television brought with it the TV dinner — a fast, convenient meal that, while nutritionally questionable, meant the whole family could gather together on the sofa to enjoy “The Ed Sullivan Show” and eat their Swanson Salisbury steak, too.

Over the next several decades, advancements in technology and the ubiquity of streaming services has allowed for the proliferation of binge-watching culture, where hours spent sedentary rack up faster than “Jeopardy” points, and greasy fast food is only a few taps on your smartphone away.

Chris Wharton, assistant dean of innovation and strategic initiatives at Arizona State University’s College of Health Solutions, whose research interests include lifestylewide behavior change, wanted to know what kind of relationship the time we spend in front of screens has with various health behaviors and factors.

In a study recently published in BMC Public Health, one of the largest open access public

Read More