The Important Difference Between Cybersecurity And Cyber Resilience (And Why You Need Both)

Cyber threats like hacking, phishing, ransomware, and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks have the potential to cause enormous problems for organizations. Not only can companies suffer serious service disruption and reputational damage, but the loss of personal data can also result in huge fines from regulators.

Take British Airways as an example. In 2019, the airline was fined more than £183m by the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) after customer data was compromised in a cyber-attack. Customer details, including name, address, logins, and payment card, were harvested by hackers – affecting half a million customers in total. The fine, which amounts to around 1.5% of British Airways’ global 2018 turnover, was the first proposed by the ICO under the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Cyberattacks like this are hitting the headlines with increasing frequency. But

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But a supportive boss can make a difference, study finds — ScienceDaily

As COVID-19 cases surged this spring, the pandemic led some people more than others to ponder their own mortality. A new study in China and the United States suggests that these people were the ones who showed the highest levels of stress and the least engagement at work.

But the research also uncovered a bright spot: The right kind of boss helped reduce stress and increase engagement and pro-social behavior in their workers who were anxious about COVID-19.

“A global pandemic can lead some people to think about their own mortality, which will understandably make them more stressed and less engaged at work,” said Jia (Jasmine) Hu, lead author of the study and associate professor of management and human resources at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business.

“But business leaders who are attentive to employees’ emotional needs and unite them behind a common purpose made a positive difference

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What’s the difference between iPhone 11 and iPhone 12?

apple-iphone-xr-vs-iphone-11-5

We don’t yet know how the iPhone XR and iPhone 11 will match up to the iPhone 12.


Angela Lang/CNET

This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple headquarters.

Apple is expected to unveil the iPhone 12 at its Oct. 13 event, and ship the new phones sometime in October. If you’re thinking about upgrading from last year’s iPhone 11 to the iPhone 12, you may be wondering: What exactly is the difference going to be?

We won’t know for sure until the new phones are revealed on Tuesday. But we’ve gathered the most probable rumors to see how the iPhone 12 will likely stack up against the iPhone 11. You can also determine if you should buy a new iPhone now or wait, and the best ways to sell or trade in your old iPhone.

Read

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Here Are the Major Difference Between Trump and Biden on Tech Issues

President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden could not be more different on several tech and innovation issues, according to a report released Monday by the nonpartisan Information Technology & Innovation Foundation.

The 40-page report compares both presidential candidates on 10 specific issue areas: innovation and research and development; internet and digital economy; broadband and telecommunications; education and skills; taxes; regulation; trade; advanced manufacturing; life science and biotechnology and clean energy innovation. The reports’ authors, led by ITIF President Robert Atkinson, found major differences on many of those core issues, chief among them the federal government’s role facilitating technology and innovation policy.

President Trump’s approach since his 2016 election has focused on “reducing government barriers” to technology and innovation, reducing taxes and eliminating regulations the administration believes limit innovation. Under Trump, the amount of federal spending on tech has generally increased during his four-year term, but ITIF notes that—with

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Age restrictions for handguns make little difference in homicides, study finds — ScienceDaily

In the United States, individual state laws barring 18- to 20-year-olds from buying or possessing a handgun make little difference in the rate of homicides involving a gun by people in that age group, a new University of Washington study has found.

“The central issue is that there’s a very high degree of informal access to firearms, such as through family members or illicit channels,” said Caitlin Moe, the study’s lead author and a PhD student in epidemiology in the UW School of Public Health. “And we can’t address that kind of availability with age limits.”

The UW study compared homicide rates involving firearms in this age group between five states that increased the minimum age to buy or possess a firearm higher than the nationwide limits set by the 1994 federal law and the 32 states that did not.

The five states were Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York

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