New technology extracting clean carbon dioxide a win-win for greenhouse growers, environment | 1 NEWS

Promising new technology using leftover forestry wood to extract clean carbon dioxide is expected to benefit commercial greenhouses growers and the environment.

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The Kiwi invention uses leftover forestry wood to extract clean carbon dioxide, helping increase crop yield and reduce emissions at the same time.
Source: 1 NEWS


The Kiwi invention would help increase crop yield and reduce emissions at the same time.

New Zealand Gourmet’s Roelf Schreuder said the produce wholesaler is currently getting CO2 for their Taupo crops from Taranaki as a waste product, which is brought in through trucks every week and “can be a hassle”. 

Now, Hot Lime Labs has developed a way of producing clean CO2 on site. The technology uses wood chips warms the plants at night while producing carbon dioxide, which is soaked up by limestone pellets, which acts as a “CO2 sponge,” founder and CEO

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Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) Market Size and Share 2020 Trends, Future Demands, Growth Factors, Emerging Technologies, Global Industry Forecast to 2023

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 25, 2020 (The Expresswire) —
“Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) Market”research provides actionable intelligence on major parameters impacting the market, analyses the market performance of key companies, market dynamics of key segments, outlines the market performance across global regions. The insights of the industry over the past 5 years and a forecast until 2023 is provided.

The rising use of titanium dioxide in ceramic industry is one of the key factors expected to trigger the market growth in the forthcoming years. It is used as popular ingredient in different products including paint, plastic, paper, pharmaceuticals, and other items. It also provides variegation and crystallization to the color and texture of ceramic glazes. It further prevents pollutants including nitrogen oxide, sulfur oxide, carbon monoxide from affecting ceramic products. As a result, the growing use of titanium oxide will eventually

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Over 15 million years, weathering rocks reduced carbon dioxide levels and cooled Earth — ScienceDaily

The Greenland ice sheet owes its existence to the growth of an arc of islands in Southeast Asia — stretching from Sumatra to New Guinea — over the last 15 million years, a new study claims.

According to an analysis by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, UC Santa Barbara and a research institute in Toulouse, France, as the Australian continent pushed these volcanic islands out of the ocean, the rocks were exposed to rain mixed with carbon dioxide, which is acidic. Minerals within the rocks dissolved and washed with the carbon into the ocean, consuming enough carbon dioxide to cool the planet and allow for large ice sheets to form over North America and Northern Europe.

“You have the continental crust of Australia bulldozing into these volcanic islands, giving you really high mountains just south of the equator,” said Nicholas Swanson-Hysell, associate professor of earth and planetary science

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Nitrogen dioxide halved but sulfur dioxide doubled — ScienceDaily

A University of Liverpool study of air pollution in the UK during the first 100 days of lockdown has revealed that whilst nitrogen oxide levels were cut by half, levels of sulphur dioxide increased by over 100%.

Researchers from the University’s School of Environmental Sciences analysed data from the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) air-quality sensors and UK Met Office stations to see how lockdown measures had affected levels of nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, particle matter (PM2.5) and ozone, and compare it to data from the past seven years.

The study revealed that during this period (from 23rd March to 13 June 2020) nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels were cut by half which would relate to the reduction in vehicle emissions. More surprisingly, though, the analysis found that levels of sulphur dioxide (SO2), typically created by UK industry but in sharp decline, were more than double that of

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Nitrogen dioxide halved, but sulphur dioxide doubled

air pollution
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A University of Liverpool study of air pollution in the UK during the first 100 days of lockdown has revealed that whilst nitrogen oxide levels were cut by half, levels of sulfur dioxide increased by over 100%.


Researchers from the University’s School of Environmental Sciences analyzed data from DEFRA air-quality sensors and UK Met Office stations to see how lockdown measures had affected levels of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, particle matter (PM2.5) and ozone and to compare this to the past seven years.

The study revealed that during this period (from 23rd March to 13 June 2020) nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels were cut by half which would relate to the reduction in vehicle emissions. More surprisingly, though, the analysis found that levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2), typically created by UK industry but in sharp decline, were more than double that of previous years.

Researchers also explored

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