U.S. Disarray Has Emerging Markets Struggling to Hold the Line

(Bloomberg) — Whatever turbulence risk assets may suffer in coming days as a result of President Donald Trump’s sickness, emerging markets can celebrate a few plus points.



a vase of flowers on a table: A worker monitors flowers in crates as they move along a conveyor belt in the warehouse at the Multiflora (PTY) Ltd. Flower Market in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020. South Africa's coronavirus epidemic is on a downward curve, with new infections, hospital admissions and the positivity rate all showing declines.


© Bloomberg
A worker monitors flowers in crates as they move along a conveyor belt in the warehouse at the Multiflora (PTY) Ltd. Flower Market in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020. South Africa’s coronavirus epidemic is on a downward curve, with new infections, hospital admissions and the positivity rate all showing declines.

Staring down almost $16 trillion of negative-yielding debt worldwide, investors will continue to be drawn to the higher returns offered by emerging-market assets and the prospect of an economic recovery next year, analysts say. Developing-nation currencies are also benefiting from broad dollar weakness, with the U.S. currency still below its 200-day moving average. Trump’s diagnosis has also made it more likely Congress and the White House will reach

Read More

Emerging Markets Look to Hold the Line as U.S. Disarray Mounts

(Bloomberg) — Put aside the inevitable hit that risk assets are taking as a result of President Donald Trump’s sickness. Emerging markets can celebrate a few plus points.



a vase of flowers on a table: A worker monitors flowers in crates as they move along a conveyor belt in the warehouse at the Multiflora (PTY) Ltd. Flower Market in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020. South Africa's coronavirus epidemic is on a downward curve, with new infections, hospital admissions and the positivity rate all showing declines.


© Bloomberg
A worker monitors flowers in crates as they move along a conveyor belt in the warehouse at the Multiflora (PTY) Ltd. Flower Market in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020. South Africa’s coronavirus epidemic is on a downward curve, with new infections, hospital admissions and the positivity rate all showing declines.

Staring down almost $16 trillion of negative-yielding debt worldwide, investors will continue to be drawn to the higher returns offered by emerging-market assets and the prospect of an economic recovery next year, analysts say. Developing-nation currencies are also benefiting from broad dollar weakness, with the U.S. currency still below its 200-day moving average. Trump’s diagnosis has also made it more likely Congress and the White House will

Read More