Facebook donates $1.3 million to boost WWII code-breaking site



a group of people sitting in front of a piano: All workers at the estate were ordered to sign the Official Secrets Act. For many young girls at the park, this meant that their families had no idea where their 18-year-old daughters had been sent.


© Crown Copyright, used with kind permission, Director GCHQ
All workers at the estate were ordered to sign the Official Secrets Act. For many young girls at the park, this meant that their families had no idea where their 18-year-old daughters had been sent.

Facebook has made a £1 million ($1.3 million) donation to the museum at Bletchley Park, where British code-breakers decrypted messages sent using Nazi Germany’s Enigma cipher and contributed to an Allied victory in World War II, after the site was forced to cut dozens of jobs as a result of the pandemic.

During the war, the mansion in Buckinghamshire, southeastern England, was home to the British government’s Code and Cypher School, where the world’s first programmable digital computer was built to decipher the Nazis’ communications.

Facebook said Monday that “the era of the computer was born” at the venue, as it announced its $1.3 million contribution.

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