Droughts are threatening global wetlands — ScienceDaily

University of Adelaide scientists have shown how droughts are threatening the health of wetlands globally.

Published in the journal Earth-Science Reviews, the scientists highlight the many physical and chemical changes occurring during droughts that lead to severe, and sometimes irreversible, drying of wetland soils.

“Wetlands around the world are incredibly important for maintaining our planet’s biodiversity and they store vast amounts of carbon that can help fight climate change,” says project leader Associate Professor Luke Mosley, from the University’s Environment Institute and School of Biological Sciences.

“Globally, wetlands cover an area greater than 12.1 million square kilometres and deliver at least A$37.8 trillion (Int$27 trillion) in benefits per year, such as for flood mitigation, food production, water quality improvement and carbon storage.”

Wetlands can suffer “water droughts” both from the effects of a drier climate, and also when excessive water is extracted or diverted that would normally flow into

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Newly identified ‘landfalling droughts’ originate over ocean — ScienceDaily

Meteorologists track hurricanes over the oceans, forecasting where and when landfall might occur so residents can prepare for disaster before it strikes. What if they could do the same thing for droughts?

Stanford scientists have now shown that may be possible in some instances — the researchers have identified a new kind of “landfalling drought” that can potentially be predicted before it impacts people and ecosystems on land. They found that these droughts, which form over the ocean and then migrate landward, can cause larger and drier conditions than droughts that occur solely over the land. Of all the droughts affecting land areas worldwide from 1981 to 2018, roughly one in six were landfalling droughts, according to the study published Sept. 21 in Water Resources Research.

“We normally don’t think about droughts over the ocean — it may even sound counterintuitive. But just as over land, there can be times

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Wildfires, Droughts, Pandemics. Is this Our Future? How to Build a Safer World.

Flames from the LNU Lightning Complex fires along Interstate 80 in Vacaville, Calif., on Aug. 19, 2020. The highway was closed in both directions shortly afterward.
Flames from the LNU Lightning Complex fires along Interstate 80 in Vacaville, Calif., on Aug. 19, 2020. The highway was closed in both directions shortly afterward.

Flames from the LNU Lightning Complex fires along Interstate 80 in Vacaville, Calif., on Aug. 19, 2020. The highway was closed in both directions shortly afterward. Credit – Noah Berger—AP

Imagine Massachusetts on fire, literally the entire state engulfed in flames. That is how much land has already been ravaged—at least 5 million acres—in the wildfires of California, Washington and Oregon. Put another way, in just a few weeks these fires have burned as much land as was destroyed by a decade of using napalm and Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. With temperatures over 100°F, toxic air now blankets tens of millions of people, power outages have afflicted vast regions, and dozens have already died from the blazes. Air quality in West Coast

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