Novel screening method predicts health complications earlier, could identify key interventions — ScienceDaily

Expanding routine newborn screening to include a metabolic vulnerability profile could lead to earlier detection of life-threatening complications in babies born preterm, according to a study by UC San Francisco researchers. The new method, which was developed at UCSF, offers valuable and time-sensitive insights into which infants are at greatest risk during their most vulnerable time, immediately after birth.

The study, published in Nature Pediatric Research by scientists at the UCSF California Preterm Birth Initiative (PTBI-CA), assessed the records of 9,639 preterm infants who experienced mortality or at least one complication or mortality.

Using the results of standard newborn profiles and blood tests, they identified a combination of six newborn characteristics and 19 metabolites that, together, created a vulnerability profile that reliably identified preterm babies at substantially increased risk for death and severe illness.

“Our results point to a number of potential biological pathways that may play a key role

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Amazon Prime Day and earlier holiday shopping will ding Black Friday, Cyber Monday

It’s beginning to look a lot like holiday shopping season even though it’s not Halloween. You can thank evolving shopping habits, COVID-19, a delayed Amazon Prime Day, supply chain concerns, and crimped consumer and business budgets.

The moving parts are going to be enough to make Black Friday more of a 2020 retailing blip than the biggest shopping day of the year.

Simply put, the calendar is moving forward and households won’t have as much to spend. The winners will be Amazon, which is likely to deliver its biggest fourth quarter in history, and retailers such as Walmart, Best Buy, and Target that have mastered buy online pickup in-store and other digital sales tactics.

In addition, Amazon’s rivals are all planning sales around Prime Day. Those moves will just create a flywheel of demand that’ll minimize the importance of retail’s big holiday shopping days.

Consider some data on holiday

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Apple Acquired Podcast App Scout FM Earlier This Year

In order to continue improving its Podcast offerings experience, Apple earlier this year purchased podcast app Scout FM, reports Bloomberg.


The website for Scout FM is now defunct, but it was available on iPhones, Android devices, and Amazon smart speakers. Scout FM generated podcast stations covering various topics, similar to a radio station but for a podcast experience.

A person could select a specific topic and then find podcasts related to that topic, with the service also offering up recommendations based on listening history and personal preference. TechCrunch explained how it worked in 2018:

Scout.fm wants to change the way people listen to podcasts. Instead of scouring through the over 500,000 shows in your current podcast app, this startup’s new curated podcast service will just ask you a few questions to find out what you like, then create a podcast station customized to you. The experience is primarily designed

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San Diego sequencing giant Illumina to reunite with Grail for $8B in bid to detect cancer earlier

San Diego gene sequencing giant Illumina announced an $8 billion deal Monday to acquire Grail Therapeutics, a Bay Area biotech once part of Illumina that is developing a blood test to catch cancer sooner.

“This deal is quite transformative for Illumina,” said Dr. Phil Febbo, chief medical officer, as it shows that the gene sequencing giant is “a company that also cares about testing for providers and patients.”

Illumina is the biggest biotech in town, and the acquisition, slated to go through by the second half of 2021, is one of the largest deals in San Diego biotech history.

It’s also something of a homecoming.

Grail spun out of Illumina in 2016 after researchers stumbled on an odd finding. They were working on a way to test a pregnant mother’s blood for signs that her child carries a genetic birth defect. But scientists found something they weren’t looking for: signs

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