Avient Biosciences Launches Largest Cannabinoid Research and Extraction Campus in Eastern U.S.

WILSON, N.C., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Avient Biosciences officially launched its 200,000-square-foot industrial hemp research and extraction facility in North Carolina’s Research Triangle region this week. Designed for full cGMP compliance (21 CFR Parts 210 and 211), Avient’s 36-acre campus includes pharmaceutical- and food-grade research and production suites, on-site analytical testing laboratories, and climate-controlled biomass storage facilities.

Avient will offer a wide array of high-quality cannabinoid ingredients to global pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, food and beverage, and cosmetic companies that are ready to leverage the anecdotal health and medical benefits of CBD in their products. Valued at $2.8 billion in 2019, the U.S. cannabinoid market is projected to grow by more than 50% by 2026.1

Committed to compliance, Avient’s initial team has more than 175 years of combined cGMP/pharmaceutical experience and is on track for EU GMP, ISO 9001, Kosher and Halal certifications by early 2021. Every industrial hemp shipment received

Read More

Study shows how climate impacts food webs, poses socioeconomic threat in Eastern Africa

Study shows how climate impacts food webs, poses socioeconomic threat in Eastern Africa
The research team spent 12 days on Lake Tanganyika collecting core samples from the lake’s floor. They chartered a Congolese merchant vessel, seen here, and adapted it for their research project. Credit: Michael McGlue, University of Kentucky

A new study is sounding the alarm on the impact climate change could have on one of the world’s most vulnerable regions.


Michael McGlue, Pioneer Natural Resources Professor of Stratigraphy in the University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and his team conducted the study at Lake Tanganyika—a major African fishery. The results, which published today in Science Advances, show how certain changes in climate may place the fishery at risk, potentially diminishing food resources for millions of people in this area of eastern Africa.

“Lake Tanganyika’s fish are a critically important resource for impoverished people from four nations (Tanzania, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi and Zambia) and resilience

Read More