Just Eat Takeaway doubled its orders in Canada. It’s coming for the US next

Just Eat Takeaway.com said on Wednesday that orders in Canada — where it operates as Skip The Dishes — rose by 98% to 23.5 million in the third quarter compared with the same period last year.

Canadians have been used to picking up food from restaurants rather than having it delivered to their homes. But that appears to be changing, encouraged by restrictions imposed during the pandemic and lockdowns that kept people at home.

“We are now transforming that pick-up culture into a delivery culture, that’s why it’s growing so quickly,” Just Eat Takeaway.com’s investor relations manager Joris Wilton told CNN Business, adding that the second quarter had seen similar levels of growth.

A big increase in the selection of meals offered by restaurants also helped, making consumers more likely to order food more often, he said.

Just Eat Takeaway.com, which was formed through a high-stakes merger last year, is
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A close study of the hunger hormone ghrelin shows that it affects how frequently animals eat; without it, they may forget when they last ate — ScienceDaily

A hormone that influences when and how frequently animals eat also appears to affect memory, USC scientists have found.

The study was published in the journal Current Biology on Sept. 17.

Animals and humans have the hormone ghrelin in their stomachs. Ghrelin tells animals, as well as humans, when they are hungry and helps regulate their metabolism, but scientists have never been certain how exactly it works.

To learn more about how ghrelin influences hunger, metabolism and memory, researchers at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences collaborated with international scientists on a study on rats.

They disrupted the ability of the ghrelin hormone to communicate to the vagus nerve, a nerve that signals from the gut to the brain, and then monitored the impact on their feeding and cognitive behaviors.

The rats were not anxious, but they began eating more frequently, said the study’s lead and corresponding

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Scientists Watch a Black Hole Eat a Star

  • Astronomers have witnessed a tidal disruption event, where a star whose material was shredded by a nearby supermassive black hole releases an bright flash of light.
  • The TDE is helping scientists understand more about the gruesome spaghettification process.
  • The flare occurred just 215 million light-years away from Earth, closer than any other previously observed tidal disruption event.

    Astronomers have spotted a rare and radiant pulse of light—the last gasp of a dying star that has been sucked toward the center of a supermassive black hole and shredded into sinuous strings of stardust. This process is delightfully called spaghettification, but make no mistake: it’s gruesome.

    🌌 You love our badass universe. So do we. Let’s nerd out over it together.

    “When a black hole devours a star, it can launch a powerful blast of material outwards that obstructs our view,” Samantha Oates, an astronomer at the University of Birmingham, said in

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