First photo of a black hole supports Einstein’s theory of relativity

The first image of a black hole, captured in 2019, has revealed more support for Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity. The new finding has suggested his theory is now 500 times harder to beat.



a star in the background: This is a simulation of M87's black hole showing the motion of plasma as it swirls around the black hole. The bright thin ring that can be seen in blue is the edge of what researchers call the black hole shadow.


© L. Medeiros/C. Chan/D. Psaltis/F. Özel; UArizona/IAS
This is a simulation of M87’s black hole showing the motion of plasma as it swirls around the black hole. The bright thin ring that can be seen in blue is the edge of what researchers call the black hole shadow.

Einstein’s theory, or the idea that gravity is matter warping space-time, has persisted for a hundred years as new astronomical discoveries have been made.

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Researchers from the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, the team that imaged the central black hole of the M87 galaxy last year, analyzed the black hole’s “shadow.”

Black holes don’t cast shadows in the typical sense because they aren’t solid objects that

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Einstein’s description of gravity just got much harder to beat — ScienceDaily

Einstein’s theory of general relativity — the idea that gravity is matter warping spacetime — has withstood over 100 years of scrutiny and testing, including the newest test from the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, published today in the latest issue of Physical Review Letters.

According to the findings, Einstein’s theory just got 500 times harder to beat.

Despite its successes, Einstein’s robust theory remains mathematically irreconcilable with quantum mechanics, the scientific understanding of the subatomic world. Testing general relativity is important because the ultimate theory of the universe must encompass both gravity and quantum mechanics.

“We expect a complete theory of gravity to be different from general relativity, but there are many ways one can modify it. We found that whatever the correct theory is, it can’t be significantly different from general relativity when it comes to black holes. We really squeezed down the space of possible modifications,” said

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Einstein’s description of gravity just got much harder to beat

Einstein's description of gravity just got much harder to beat
Visualization of the new gauge developed to test the predictions of modified gravity theories against the measurement of the size of the M87 shadow. Credit: D. Psaltis, UArizona; EHT Collaboration

Einstein’s theory of general relativity—the idea that gravity is matter warping spacetime—has withstood over 100 years of scrutiny and testing, including the newest test from the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, published today in the latest issue of Physical Review Letters.


According to the findings, Einstein’s theory just got 500 times harder to beat.

Despite its successes, Einstein’s robust theory remains mathematically irreconcilable with quantum mechanics, the scientific understanding of the subatomic world. Testing general relativity is important because the ultimate theory of the universe must encompass both gravity and quantum mechanics.

“We expect a complete theory of gravity to be different from general relativity, but there are many ways one can modify it. We found that whatever the correct

Read More