Employees To Get Permanent Work From Home Through Summer 2021

KEY POINTS

  • 90% employees don’t want to a rigid office schedule: Dropbox’s internal survey
  • Employees can make their own schedules in the new ‘virtual first’ policy
  • Dropbox will set up collaboration spaces called ‘Dropbox Studios’ 

Cloud services company Dropbox is allowing its employees to work from home permanently, as part of its new ‘virtual first’ approach, it announced Tuesday in a blog post.

All employees of Dropbox have been working from home since March when the pandemic triggered lockdowns. This mandatory work-from-home policy has now been extended until June 2021. The change comes after an internal survey by the company suggested that nearly 90% of employees feel productive at home and don’t want to return to a rigid five-day in-office workweek.

Dropbox is the latest to join technology companies including Microsoft, Twitter, Slack, and Facebook to announce permanent work-from-home policies.

“Remote work will be the primary experience for all employees

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The COVID-19 Crisis Presents An Opportunity For Companies To Step Up Their Efforts In Ensuring The Safety and Well-Being Of Their Employees


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Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


You’re reading Entrepreneur Middle East, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

It is no surprise that the COVID-19 crisis has gravely affected the mental health and well-being of employees. Business priorities and goals all over the world have drastically changed, with key challenges being to keep the business afloat, as well as manage the safety and security of employees.

The social distancing measures implemented by governments within the Middle East region have made people more isolated and uncertain. Homes have turned into offices, playgrounds, gyms, and schools, and changes due to health threats and job losses are not helping to make the situation better. Moreover, in the fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry, our frontliners had to leave the safety of their homes, and make sure that the food is produced and displayed on the shelves of

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Dropbox is letting all employees work from home permanently

  • Dropbox just announced it would allow all employees to work from home permanently. 
  • The company initially ordered staff to work from home in March, during the initial outbreak of COVID-19 in the US.
  • The company plans to convert its existing offices to coworking spaces to aid in team building and collaboration.
  • Twitter and Atlassian have also allowed all employees to permanently work from home.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Dropbox is going remote — permanently. 

The cloud-storage company announced Tuesday it would allow all employees to work from home going forward. The shift comes after an internal survey found nearly 90% of Dropbox workers said they were more productive at home.

“Starting today, Dropbox is becoming a Virtual First company,” the company said in a blog post. “Remote work (outside an office) will be the primary experience for all employees and the day-to-day default for individual work.”

Dropbox

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Silicon Valley is famously liberal. Then, investors and employees started clashing over race.

SAN FRANCISCO — The day after President Donald Trump told the Proud Boys, a far-right group with a history of inciting violence, to “stand back and stand by,” during the first presidential debate last month, tech investor Cyan Banister tweeted that the group had “a few bad apples. “

The open defense of an organization that has been deemed a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center is one extreme example of an increasingly public reactionary streak in Silicon Valley that diverges from the tech industry’s image as a bastion of liberalism. Some libertarian, centrist, and right-leaning Silicon Valley investors and executives, who wield outsize influence, power and access to capital, describe tech culture as under siege by activist employees pushing a social justice agenda.

Curtis Yarvin, dubbed a “favorite philosopher of the alt-right” by the Verge, has become a familiar face on the invite-only audio social network Clubhouse,

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Microsoft To Let Employees Work From Home Permanently: Report

Software giant Microsoft will let employees work from home permanently if they choose to, US media reported on Friday, becoming the latest employer to expand work-from-home provisions prompted by the Covid-19 pandemic.

US tech news website The Verge said most Microsoft employees are still at home as the health crisis drags on, and the company doesn’t expect to reopen its US offices until January of next year at the earliest.

But when it does, workers can chose to work from home permanently with their manager’s approval, although they will have to give up their office space.

“The Covid-19 pandemic has challenged all of us to think, live and work in new ways,” human resources head Kathleen Hogan said in a note to employees obtained by The Verge.

“We will offer as much flexibility as possible to support individual work styles, while balancing business needs and ensuring we live our culture.”

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Microsoft’s 150,000 employees can work from home permanently: report

Even when stay-at-home measures for the coronavirus pandemic are lifted, Microsoft employees won’t be required to come back to the office.

According to an internal Microsoft memo obtained by The Verge, Microsoft employees will be allowed to work from home for less than half of their work week. Pending manager approval, some employees will be allowed to work from home full time.

Given the nature of Microsoft’s business as a software and hardware creator, some employees with roles that require a physical presence won’t be able to take advantage of the new “hybrid workplace” policy, according to the report. Employees involved in hardware research and development, for instance, or employees involved with in-person training, won’t be able to do that work remotely.

For others, whose work can be done entirely remote, there are options to relocate — even internationally — if approved. The Verge reported that “most” of Microsoft’s 150,000

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Microsoft will let employees work from home half the time

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

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Microsoft informed employees this week that they will have more flexibility to work from home, even after it’s safe to return to offices, a company spokesperson told CNBC Friday.

The new guidelines, previously reported by The Verge, allow all Microsoft employees to work remotely less than 50% of the time. Employees can also request approval from their managers to work remotely full time, or even move to a new location, with salaries adjusted based on geography.

Microsoft last told U.S. employees to expect to work remotely until at least January 2021.

“We shared guidelines internally this week to provide options for our employees to plan ahead for when we can return to the workplace safely,” a Microsoft spokesperson said in a statement to CNBC. “Our goal is to evolve the way we work over time with intention—guided by employee input, data and our commitment

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Microsoft Will Let Employees Work From Home Permanently

Microsoft will let its employees work from home permanently, even once the COVID-19 pandemic is over.

In an internal memo seen by The Verge that highlights the company’s plans to create a “hybrid workplace”, Microsoft said it will allow employees to work from home freely for less than 50% of their working week, but has said that managers will be able to approve permanent remote work if staff request it. Part-time working hours will also be available for employees with approval from their manager. 

Currently, the cast majority of the company’s employees are working from home, and Microsoft previously said they would not reopen office until at least January 2021. 

For those whose work can be done entirely remote, there are options to relocate

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As Seattle Companies Accelerate Technology Investments, Few Employees Say New Technologies Have a Positive Impact on their Organizations

Lack of Employee Input & Training Puts Technology and Automation ROI at Risk

SEATTLE, Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Seattle companies continue to invest heavily in technologies such as automation, robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) to reinvent how work is done. But as companies in the Seattle area increasingly deploy new technologies, they may miss major opportunities to get the most out of their investments because of a missing critical factor – employee engagement. 

According to a new survey of Seattle workers by Eagle Hill Consulting, only 29 percent say that their company invests in the right technologies to support them.
According to a new survey of Seattle workers by Eagle Hill Consulting, only 29 percent say that their company invests in the right technologies to support them.

According to a new survey of Seattle workers by Eagle Hill Consulting, only 29 percent say that their company invests in the right technologies to support them. And just 38 percent agree that technology change has had a positive impact on the organization.

Also, about three-fourths of Seattle

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As Companies Accelerate Technology Investments, Few Employees Say New Technologies Have a Positive Impact on their Organizations

Lack of Employee Input & Training Puts Technology and Automation ROI at Risk

ARLINGTON, Va., Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Corporate executives have been investing heavily in technologies such as automation, robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) to reinvent how work is done. But as companies increasingly deploy new technologies, they may miss major opportunities to get the most out of their investments because of a missing critical factor – employee engagement. 

A new Eagle Hill Consulting national survey of U.S. workers finds 19% percent say their company invests in the right technologies to help employees do their job.
A new Eagle Hill Consulting national survey of U.S. workers finds 19% percent say their company invests in the right technologies to help employees do their job.

According to a new national survey of U.S. workers by Eagle Hill Consulting, just 23 percent say technology changes have had a positive impact on their organization. Only 19 percent say their company invests in the right technologies to help employees do their job.

Also, more than two-thirds of workers say

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