Seven Los Alamos scientists and engineers honored as 2020 Laboratory Fellows | US Department of Energy Science News

12-Oct-2020

Tanmoy Bhattacharya, Christopher Fontes, Vania Jordanova, Thomas Leitner, John Lestone, Joseph Martz and Ralph Menikoff become part of a prestigious fellowship

DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

The 2020 Laboratory Fellows: top Row (left to right): Tanmoy Bhattacharya, Christopher Fontes, Vania Jordanova, and Thomas Leitner. Bottom Row (left to right): Ralph Menikoff, Joseph Martz, and John Lestone


LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 12, 2020–Seven Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and engineers have been named 2020 Laboratory Fellows: Tanmoy Bhattacharya, Christopher Fontes, Vania Jordanova, Thomas Leitner, John Lestone, Joseph Martz and Ralph Menikoff.

“Recognizing the Fellows of Los Alamos National Laboratory is one of my proudest responsibilities. To be a Fellow is to be a leader at the Laboratory and within the scientific community at large,” said Thom Mason, director of Los Alamos National Laboratory. “Thank you to this year’s seven Fellows for their dedication and exceptional contributions.”

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Ulefone Armor 9: The best Android 10 smartphone for engineers and outdoor workers

I’ve been using the new Ulefone Armor 9 Android 10 smartphone for a few weeks, and the more I use it, the more I like it.

And the accessories make it even better.

OK, so on the outside, the Armor 9 is a highly ruggedized smartphone that’s built from the ground up to take a battering, meeting a whole array of standards, including IP68, IP69K, and MIL-STD-810G, which means that it’s happy immersed in water at depths down to 1.5 meters for 30 minutes, exposure to high-pressure water jets and steam cleaning, drops from 1.2 meter heights, resists dust, shrugs off acids, and low pressures.

It’s tough.

The 6.3-inch 2340 x 1080 FHD+ 410 PPI LCD multi-touch display with IPS technology is nice and big, and can be operated by gloves. The MediaTek Helios P90 octa-core processor is fast and keeps everything moving along nicely, and the 8GB LPDDR4x dual-channel

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New engineering challenge to inspire the next generation of female engineers in Malaysia

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Last week saw the launch of a brand new bespoke engineering challenge with the Girl Guides Association Malaysia (Persatuan Pandu Puteri Malaysia). Developed by a team of female engineers from BAE Systems, the challenge will see up to 280,000 young women have the opportunity to complete a series of fun and engaging engineering tasks in order to earn the new ‘Gear up’ girl guiding badge.

Sugee R Bhanoo, Head of Capabilities APAC, BAE Systems Applied Intelligence providing an overview of the ‘Gear up’ badge to esteemed members and guests at the Girl Guides Association Malaysia annual conference.
Sugee R Bhanoo, Head of Capabilities APAC, BAE Systems Applied Intelligence providing an overview of the ‘Gear up’ badge to esteemed members and guests at the Girl Guides Association Malaysia annual conference.

The launch of the badge follows the success of similar launches by BAE Systems and Girl Guides in the UK and Singapore, which has seen many budding young female engineers encouraged to take an interest in the fields of science, technology, engineering and

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LRD is proud supporter of National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). > U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters > Story Article View

CINCINNATI– (Oct. 1, 2020) – October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month, an observance tied to the Army’s commitment to a diverse and inclusive workforce. The theme, “Increasing Access and Opportunity,” promotes educating employees and hiring authorities about disability employment issues and celebrating the many and varied contributions of workers with disabilities.

“Emphasis should be on the point that people with disabilities are typically creative problem solvers; they must be able to navigate a world historically designed for people without disabilities,” noted Jennifer Sheehy, deputy assistant secretary, of the Army’s Office of Disability Employment Policy.

In 1945, Congress declared the first week of October “National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week.” In 1962, the word “physically” was dropped to include individuals with all types of disabilities. Congress expanded the week to a month in 1988 and changed the commemoration to National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

This year marks not only the

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Information Technology Laboratory employees win HENAAC awards > U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters > Story Article View

Christine Lozano and Dr. Alicia Ruvinsky, both members of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Information Technology Laboratory team, were named winners of the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Association Conference (HENAAC) 2020 Great Minds in STEM award.

HENAAC’s annual awards have recognized America’s top engineers and scientists from the Hispanic community for the past 31 years. Lozano was named a STEM hero, while Ruvinsky was honored for professional achievement.

“When I was younger, I was introduced to a drafting class by a female architect,” said Lozano. “It was through this drafting class that I realized that my appreciation for art and creativity could go hand in hand with my strength in math. As I kept looking around, I had male engineering influences, who I am so thankful for because they nurtured my goals and desires, but I never really had a female STEM influence. One of my dreams

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MIT Engineers Have Created a Completely Flat Fisheye Lens

Illustration for article titled This Perfectly Flat Fisheye Lens Could Help Shave Down Camera Bumps

Image: Felice Frankel/MIT

Fisheye lenses make for some cool photos, but their most distinctive feature is that the glass is curved. The need for multiple bits of curved glass makes fisheye lenses both bulky and expensive. However, engineers at MIT and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell have figured out a way to make a fisheye lens that’s completely flat and could be applied in consumer devices, medical applications, and more.

The method of flattening something that is known for being bubble-like is pretty clever. To do it, the engineers used something called a “metalens,” or a flat piece of glass measuring just a millimeter thick. On the back of the metalens, they then carved teeny structures to scatter incoming light in a way that produces the same type of ultrawide, panoramic images a fisheye lens would. More specifically, the metalens is made from a transparent piece of calcium

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