Scientist maps CO2 emissions for entire US to improve environmental policymaking — ScienceDaily

With intense wildfires in the western U.S. and frequent, intense hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, the nation is again affected by extreme weather-related events resulting from climate change. In response, cities, states and regions across the country are developing policies to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases, chiefly carbon dioxide (CO2). Even though many state and local governments are committed to these goals, however, the emissions data they have to work with is often too general and too expensive to provide a useful baseline and target the most effective policy.

Professor Kevin Gurney of Northern Arizona University’s School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems today published results in the Journal of Geophysical Research detailing greenhouse gas emissions across the entire U.S. landscape at high space- and time-resolution with details on economic sector, fuel and combustion process.

Gurney, who specializes in atmospheric science, ecology and public policy, has

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Better Buy: Apple Stock or the Entire Nasdaq?

The tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite has been the top-performing major index amid the challenges created by the coronavirus and economic uncertainty this year. 

^IXIC Chart

Data by YCharts

The index’s performance is similarly impressive if you zoom further out: The Nasdaq climbed roughly 370% over the last decade while the S&P 500 index rose 195%, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average is up 157.5%. Meanwhile, shares of tech giant Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) have soared by roughly 1,000% across the same stretch. 

Apple now stands as the biggest company in the Nasdaq and the largest U.S. company, with a market capitalization of roughly $2 trillion even after a recent pullback. Those strong performances from both the tech sector and its largest company raise the question: Should investors buy into Apple stock or an index fund that includes many of the technology industry’s most influential players?

A person looking at graphs and chart lines.

Image source: Getty images.

The basics of owning an index

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Aurora, Illinois CIO Makes Entire City An Innovation District As Part Of Proposed $300 Million Project

Michael Pegues, a relative newcomer to government, is the CIO of the second largest city in Illinois. Despite only being in the job for three years and having no background in local government, he has developed a passion for city work and has become an urbantech champion.

What makes Pegues’ case so interesting is that he has taken a much bolder approach to encouraging innovation than many other city CIOs. In my experience, cities often set up limited innovation zones where they experiment with technologies before rolling them out more widely. Pegues has eschewed this intermediate step and turned his city into one giant innovation sandbox through his 605 Innovation District project (605 being the first three digits of the five zip codes in Aurora).

It’s a bold move—and one that isn’t without risks. But the initiative shows how a forward-thinking CIO willing to embrace and successfully manage those

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An Old TV Crashed an Entire Village’s Broadband for 18 Months

If your broadband keeps going haywire, maybe someone nearby is using an ancient television set.

News out of the U.K. this week revealed that such an issue knocked out the broadband connections for an entire village for more than a year.

According to Openreach, which operates the nation’s digital network, the broadband connection for the 400 residents of Aberhosan, Wales, would fail every morning at 7 a.m. But no one knew why.

Investigations by engineers showed that the network itself appeared to be working fine, but just to be sure, they decided to replace large parts of the cabling that served the village. But the issue persisted.

“As a team we’d been facing an ongoing issue in Aberhosan for months,” said Openreach engineer Michael Jones. “Not being able to solve the fault for our customers left us feeling frustrated and downbeat, but we were determined to get to the bottom

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