Alion Awarded $73 Million Task Order to Provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment Research and Development

WASHINGTON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The U.S. Navy has awarded Alion Science and Technology a $73 million task order with a 60-month period of performance to provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment (JTSE) Research and Development (R&D) for Joint Staff J7, Deputy Director Joint Training (JS J7 DDJT) Environment Architecture Division (EAD). Alion was awarded this contract under the Department of Defense Information Analysis Center’s (DoD IAC) multiple-award contract (MAC) vehicle. These DoD IAC MAC task orders (TOs) are awarded by the U.S. Air Force’s 774th Enterprise Sourcing Squadron to develop and create new knowledge for the enhancement of the DTIC repository and the R&D and S&T community.

“We are dedicated to our continued customer partnership to develop joint virtual environments to prepare for Joint All Domain Command and Control (JADC2),” said Katie Selbe, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Alion’s Cyber Network Solutions Group. “Alion has

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Real Time Remote Buoy/AtoN, Lantern and Environment Monitoring Kits for Ports and Waterways From SRT Marine Technology

SRT Marine Technology is pleased to announce the availability of a range of new kits that make it easy and cost effective for any port or waterway authority to significantly improve safety through effective and reliable monitoring of buoys, lanterns and the environment with real time information displayed on your existing VTS system.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005090/en/

New innovative AtoN monitoring kits from SRT enable port and waterway authorities to significantly enhance safety and reduce risk (Graphic: Business Wire)

These innovative new AtoN monitoring kits enable port and waterway authorities to significantly enhance safety and reduce risk by alerting relevant authorities and vessels to off-position buoys, faulty lanterns, and poor weather. By using AIS, the information is automatically displayed on existing port VTS and vessel ECDIS.

DAS Carbon-1 – Buoy, Lantern and Weather Monitoring AIS AtoN Kit – this kit enables you to

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New technology extracting clean carbon dioxide a win-win for greenhouse growers, environment | 1 NEWS

Promising new technology using leftover forestry wood to extract clean carbon dioxide is expected to benefit commercial greenhouses growers and the environment.

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The Kiwi invention uses leftover forestry wood to extract clean carbon dioxide, helping increase crop yield and reduce emissions at the same time.
Source: 1 NEWS


The Kiwi invention would help increase crop yield and reduce emissions at the same time.

New Zealand Gourmet’s Roelf Schreuder said the produce wholesaler is currently getting CO2 for their Taupo crops from Taranaki as a waste product, which is brought in through trucks every week and “can be a hassle”. 

Now, Hot Lime Labs has developed a way of producing clean CO2 on site. The technology uses wood chips warms the plants at night while producing carbon dioxide, which is soaked up by limestone pellets, which acts as a “CO2 sponge,” founder and CEO

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Behind China’s ‘pork miracle’: how technology is transforming rural hog farming | Environment

In November 2018, I travelled to Guangzhou, a city of about 14 million people in southern China. Late autumn is the time for making lap yuk, a type of preserved pork that is a local speciality, and across town I would often spot slabs of meat hanging from high-rise apartment balconies, tied up with string and swaying next to shirts and sheets left out to dry. To make lap yuk, a piece of raw pork belly is soaked in a blend of rice wine, salt, soy sauce and spices, then hung out to cure in the damp, cold autumn air. The fat becomes translucent and imparts a savoury-sweet taste to any stir-fried vegetable dish. A relative of mine claims that only southern China can make preserved pork like this. The secret is the native spores and bacteria that are carried on the wind there.

Guangzhou was the first

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Australian pro surfer Matt Wilkinson’s narrow escape from shark caught on camera | Environment

Drone footage has captured professional surfer Matt Wilkinson’s narrow escape from a 1.5m great white shark off the coast of Ballina in northern New South Wales.

The world championship tour surfer was paddling on his board near Sharpes Beach on Wednesday when a shark swam quickly up behind him.

“I heard a splash and a noise and looked around and couldn’t see anything,” Wilkinson said, according to a statement from Surf Life Saving NSW.

Surf lifesavers were operating a drone overhead and were able to broadcast a warning from the aircraft’s speakers.

“The drone came down and told me that there was a dangerous shark in the area, return to the beach,” Wilkinson said.

“I got to the shore feeling a bit weird and the lifeguards showed me the footage and I realised how close it came without knowing it was there. It looks like it’s going for my leg

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Advisors use technology to handle challenge in helping clients adjust to the new environment

  • Financial advisory firms have had to adapt using virtual technologies to keep their meetings going with clients.
  • Their newfound comfort with tech will probably change advisory practices well into the future.
  • Top-ranked firms in the 2020 CNBC FA 100 list weigh in on how technology has transformed their businesses.



Abby Phon sitting at a desk in front of a laptop computer


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The Covid-19 pandemic has pushed more financial advisors to figure out how to meet virtually with clients.

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Advisory firms have had to find ways to be able to adapt through the use of virtual technologies to keep their meetings going with clients. That newfound comfort will probably change advisory practices well into the future.

To that point, the first Zoom video meeting that the advisors at Salem Investment Counselors had earlier this year to discuss financial markets was not a resounding success.

“We spent half the time troubleshooting people’s connections, and then it shut down

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Advisors use technology to help clients adjust to the new environment

Luis Alvarez | DigitalVision | Getty Images

The Covid-19 pandemic has pushed more financial advisors to figure out how to meet virtually with clients.

Advisory firms have had to find ways to be able to adapt through the use of virtual technologies to keep their meetings going with clients. That newfound comfort will probably change advisory practices well into the future.

To that point, the first Zoom video meeting that the advisors at Salem Investment Counselors had earlier this year to discuss financial markets was not a resounding success.

“We spent half the time troubleshooting people’s connections, and then it shut down after a half-hour,” said Kip Keener, chief compliance officer for the Winston-Salem, North Carolina-based firm. Salem was ranked No. 1 on CNBC’s FA 100 ranking this year.

Keener immediately switched to a corporate Zoom account and says that videoconferencing between employees and with clients has quickly become an

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Java leverages innovation to maintain its relevance in fast-paced tech environment

Java is the world’s most popular programming language and the leading application development platform — and it wants to remain a cornerstone of enterprise application stacks for years to come.

Its bet for continuing to thrive in the fast-paced technology industry is a strategy based on three pillars: trust, innovation and predictability, according to Manish Gupta (pictured, right), vice president of global marketing at Oracle and a Java steward since 2010.

“As Oracle acquired Sun [Microsystems] over 10 years ago, it’s really kept front of mind two aspects of what we want to do: The first one was to ensure there was broad accessibility to the technology and the platform for anybody that wanted to benefit from it. And the second one was to ensure that the ecosystem remained vibrant and thriving throughout,” Gupta said. “Underpinning these two objectives are really the three pillars of our strategy.”

The Java programming

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Jupiter Killed Earth-Like Environment On Hellish Planet

KEY POINTS

  • Jupiter’s early gravitational pull may have killed Venus’ habitable surrounding
  • Venus has extreme temperatures that can kill any form of life
  • The case on Venus serves as a warning for Earth to avoid a similar temperature rise

Venus would have been capable of hosting life similar to Earth if not only for Jupiter’s interference in its planetary motion. The planet, named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty, was thrown off by the largest planet in our solar system from its original orbit around the sun.

The planet, also dubbed as Earth’s twin, was not as hostile to life forms as to how it is today, if not for Jupiter’s behavior in the solar system, according to a study published in the Planetary Science Journal. The study said Jupiter changed its planetary course, moving closer and then away again from the sun. Since it is a huge

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Recent findings suggest the repeated evolution of similar traits in island lizards was not channelled by developmental responses to the environment, as commonly thought — ScienceDaily

Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards, in a study published recently in eLife.

The findings in Greater Antillean Anolis lizards provide insights on why creatures often evolve similar physical features independently when living in similar habitats. They suggest that the role of developmental plasticity in shaping adaptive evolution may be less important than commonly thought.

Developmental plasticity refers to how development responds to the environment, in particular the way that an organism’s genetic constitution (or genotype) interacts with its environment during development to produce a particular set of characteristics (or phenotype).

“Anolis lizards that live on all four of the Greater Antillean islands have independently and repeatedly evolved six different body types for maneuvering through their given habitat,” says lead author Nathalie Feiner, Researcher at the Department of Biology, Lund University, Sweden. “As a result, they make a great model

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