Agency Reveals Details About Bennu, Including Finding Possible Lifeforms

KEY POINTS

  • OSIRIS-REx will collect samples from Bennu on Oct. 20
  • Bennu came from a parent body which had enough heat to keep water in its soils
  • Nightingale will be the mission’s primary sample site
  • The samples are set to be delivered back on Earth on Sept. 24, 2023

NASA has shared more information about asteroid Bennu and the agency’s mission to bring back samples of the asteroid’s surface through their OSIRIS-REx mission on Oct. 20. The 861-foot asteroid may contain ingredients for life.

In a recent article shared by NASA, the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) is set to travel to a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu to collect a 2.1-ounce sample and bring it back to Earth for further study. The mission plans to shed more light for scientists on how life began in the solar system, as well as improve their knowledge on asteroids that

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Mario Molina, Nobel-winning Mexican chemist who made key climate change finding, dies at 77

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mario Molina, winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1995 and the only Mexican scientist to be honored with a Nobel, died Wednesday in his native Mexico City. He was 77 years old.

Molina’s family announced his death in a brief statement through the institute that carried his name. It did not give a cause of death.

He won the prize along with scientists Frank Sherwood Rowland of the United States and Paul Crutzen of the Netherlands for their research into climate change.

Molina and Rowland published a paper in 1974 that saw the thinning of the ozone layer as a consequence of chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, chemicals used in a range of products.

Molina’s work contributed to the drafting of the first international treaty on the subject, the Montreal Protocol, which phased out the use of the chemicals. Later, he focused on confronting air pollution

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Finding a better route to treating social anxiety disorder may lie in another part of the brain, researchers suggest — ScienceDaily

Studies have long suggested that oxytocin — a hormone that can also act as a neurotransmitter — regulates prosocial behavior such as empathy, trust and bonding, which led to its popular labeling as the “love hormone.” Mysteriously, oxytocin has also been shown to play a role in antisocial behaviors and emotions, including reduced cooperation, envy and anxiety. How oxytocin could exert such opposite roles had largely remained a mystery, but a new UC Davis study sheds light on how this may work.

Working with California mice, UC Davis researches showed that the “love hormone” oxytocin can sometimes have antisocial effects depending on where in the brain it is made. (Mark Chappell/UC Riverside)

While most oxytocin is produced in an area of the brain known as the hypothalamus, some oxytocin is produced in another brain area known as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, or BNST. The BNST is known

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SC woman says technology gap became obstacle to finding new job

“I’m out here in a new world where there’s a lot of technology I don’t have access to,” Marianetta Smith said. “It’s a struggle in every area.”

ROCK HILL, S.C. — A 62-year-old Rock Hill woman said she was denied benefits, after losing much of her income because of the shutdown. To make matters worse, she said she struggled to compete in the virtual job market without the proper skills or resources.

Marianetta Smith said she wants to work and is actively looking for jobs, but she said it’s been tough without a computer in this virtual world.

“I’m out here in a new world where there’s a lot of technology I don’t have access to,” Smith said. “It’s a struggle in every area.”

Smith said she’s among those left behind in the pandemic. In fact, even the Zoom interview with WCNC Charlotte almost didn’t happen. 

After several hiccups with

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Biology textbooks may need to be re-written, with scientists finding a new piece of DNA essential to forming male sex organs in mice — ScienceDaily

Biology textbooks may need to be re-written, with scientists finding a new piece of DNA essential to forming male sex organs in mice.

An international research collaboration with The University of Queensland found the Y-chromosome gene that makes mice male is made up of two different DNA parts, not one, as scientists had previously assumed.

UQ’s Institute of Molecular Biosciences Emeritus Professor Peter Koopman said the critical DNA fragment had been hidden from researchers for more than 30 years.

“Expression of the Y chromosomal gene Sry is required for male development in mammals and since its discovery in 1990 has been considered a one-piece gene,” he said.

“Sry turns out to have a cryptic second part, which nobody suspected was there, that is essential for determining the sex of male mice. We have called the two-piece gene Sry-T.”

The scientists tested their theory and found that male mice (XY) lacking

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Finding right drug balance for Parkinson’s patients — ScienceDaily

Parkinson’s disease is most commonly treated with levodopa, a drug which alleviates the slowing of bodily movements, called bradykinesia, found in Parkinson’s disease patients.

But the benefits of levodopa wear off as the disease progresses. The relationship between its dosage and its effectiveness becomes fuzzy, and high doses can result in dyskinesia, which are involuntary and uncontrollable movements.

To better understand the underlying reasons behind these effects, researchers from the Université de Montréal, University of Bologna, and University of Ottawa created a model of the interactions between levodopa, dopamine, and the basal ganglia, an area of the brain that plays a crucial role in Parkinson’s disease. They discuss their findings in the journal Chaos, from AIP Publishing.

“In Parkinson’s disease, the dopaminergic neurons of the basal ganglia are dying, which results in a lower concentration of dopamine. Levodopa is effective at the beginning of the disease, because it can

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Finding Zen In The Small Things

The miniaturization trend triggered by the ultra-compact form factor NUCs from Intel has emerged as a key driver in the growth of the PC market. Processor power efficiency is of paramount importance in this space, and AMD had been caught napping when the NUCs began to take flight. The introduction of the Zen microarchitecture in the Ryzen processors has scripted a remarkable turnaround for AMD. With leading core counts, the Ryzen processors have taken the HEDT market by storm. UCFF PC manufacturers, however, opted to play the wait and watch game, and it took a while before the embedded SoC versions of the first-generation Ryzens started appearing in the PC market. Last year, ASRock Industrial introduced one of the first Ryzen UCFF systems in the form of the 4X4 BOX-V1000M. This review attempts to figure out how the unit fares against the entrenched incumbents.

Introduction and Product Impressions

Small form-factor

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Meet the rat who just won a medal of bravery for finding 39 land mines

magawa-web-save-lives2x-1

Now that’s the face of a proud rat. 


Apopo

Big congratulations are in order for Magawa, an African giant pouched rat just awarded a gold medal for “life-saving bravery” for his work detecting dangerous land mines. 

Born in Tanzania in 2014, Magawa has since age 2 enjoyed a highly successful career detecting land mines in Cambodia. So far, he’s found 39 land mines and 28 items of unexploded ordnance, according to Apopo, a global nonprofit started in Belgium that trains rats for humanitarian work such as sniffing out land mines and tuberculosis.  

Magawa’s impressive record makes him Apopo’s most successful working rat, or “HeroRat,” to date. It also makes him the first rat in UK animal charity PDSA’s 77-year history of honoring critters to win a coveted PDSA Gold Medal. Other animals to get the

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Finding Martian Microbes Could Require Digging Miles Underground

NASA’s Perseverance rover is flying to Mars as you read this sentence. It will land there in February 2021 and set aside rocks with promising signs of ancient life, for a future mission to pick up for analysis.

But what about current life on Mars? Are microbes embedded in the ice caps? Perhaps they are sheltering in water runoff in some crater? Or, as some scientists suggest, is life buried miles underground — a difficult spot for us to search, at best?

A new study is trying to figure out ways to hunt for life on worlds that have little or no running water at the surface. One easy answer, in theory, is to look to water reserves underground — and we are pretty sure Mars

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Finding A New Job Is Hard, But New Tech Can Change That

How do you share your talents, abilities, knowledge, and achievements? It isn’t always easy to communicate what we can do through a résumé or job application. We all accumulate learning, skills, and experience as we travel the road of life. The challenge is conveying this experience effectively to take advantage of the opportunities presented to us as we strive to meet our personal potential. The challenges created by our byzantine processes of communicating information around achievements cause real problems for everyone—and serve as significant barriers to opportunity for many.

But emerging technology can give us ownership of our verified learning achievements and allow us to seamlessly share our

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