Asteroid Bennu Could Shed Light on How Ingredients for Life Reached Earth | Smart News

A series of studies published last week in the journals Science and Science Advances offer a new, detailed look at the makeup of a small asteroid called Bennu. The studies come just before NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft plans to pick up a sample from the asteroid’s surface on October 20 and return with it to Earth in 2023.

Before the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft reached the asteroid in 2018, astronomers could only study it with telescopes that couldn’t make out details smaller than cities or states, Michael Greshko reports for National Geographic. OSIRIS-REx allows astronomers to map details the size of basketball courts, sheets of paper and postage stamps, depending on the imaging tool they used.

“The reason there’s so much interest in asteroids is a lot of them are very primitive, from when the Solar System formed, and they didn’t change with wind and water, or weather like on Earth,” planetary

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How To Protect Your Privacy Online In 8 Tips : Life Kit : NPR

Your tech is watching you.

Jackie Ferrentino for NPR

Your tech is watching you.

Jackie Ferrentino for NPR

Before I became a reporter at NPR, I worked for a few years at tech companies.

One of the companies was in the marketing technology business — the industry that’s devoted in part to tracking people and merging their information, so they can be advertised to more effectively.

That tracking happens in multiple senses: Physical tracking, because we carry our phones everywhere we go. And virtual tracking, of all the places we go online.

The more I understood how my information was being collected, shared and sold, the more I wanted to protect my privacy. But it’s still hard to know which of my efforts are actually effective and which are a waste of time.

So I reached out to experts in digital security and privacy to find out what they do to protect their stuff – and what they recommend most

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CBRE highlights 6 markets with rapidly growing life science clusters

  • Life science real estate is hot, with the lab space square footage growing by almost 12% across the US in the last year, according CBRE report detailing growth in the largest biotech clusters. 
  • CBRE’s report highlighted the 13 largest biotech clusters and the top 10 emerging clusters, showing how record amounts of funding from the National Insitutes of Health and venture capital are translating to the real estate markets.
  • Business Insider highlighted 6 clusters that are seeing large amounts of growth, whether they’re established but growing very rapidly, like New York City, or they’re emerging, like Pittsburgh and Houston.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Real estate to house pharmaceutical, biotech, and other medical research professionals is growing at a rapid pace and rents continue to rise, a sign that tenant demand can support the increasing attention on life sciences from institutional investors and developers. 

Lab space has grown

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Kamchatka Marine Life Death Caused By Algae: Russian Scientist

The mass death of sea creatures in Russia’s Kamchatka region was caused by toxins from microalgae rather than man-made pollution, a senior Russian scientist said on Monday, citing preliminary findings of an investigation.

Locals on the volcanic peninsula in the Pacific raised the alarm in September as surfers experienced stinging eyes and sea creatures, including octopuses, seals and sea urchins, were found dead on the shore.

Scientists suggested that up to 95 percent of marine life living along the seabed in the affected area had died.

Conservation activists had raised concern that the source of the pollution could be a Soviet era storage ground for poisonous chemicals on Kamchatka that might have seeped out into the sea.

“I am sure that we are facing a large-scale phenomenon, but not an uncommon one for Kamchatka, called harmful blooming algae,” the vice president of Russia’s Academy of Sciences, Andrei Adrianov, told journalists

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A well-timed Venus flyby looks for signs of life

Just weeks after the reported discovery of phosphine on Venus – a potential sign of life in the clouds above its hellish surface – a robot spacecraft will study the planet as it swings by on its exploration of the solar system.

The BepiColombo space probe’s flyby above Venus at two minutes before midnight ET Wednesday is a coincidence.

The “gravity slingshot” was planned years ago, long before astronomers detected traces of phosphine in the Venusian atmosphere.

But it’s the first spacecraft to get near Venus since the discovery – although probably not the last – and measure gases in the planet’s atmosphere.

“We will look at what we see in the data, and look for everything – the expected and the unexpected,” said Jörn Helbert of the German Aerospace Center’s Institute of Planetary Research in Berlin, who works on a BepiColombo instrument called the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared

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How could a toxic gas be a sign of life of Venus?

Scientists recently announced that they had found possible signs of life in the clouds of Venus. We probably should have suspected as much all along.

Venus is a natural place to look for life beyond Earth. It is Earth’s twin — almost the same size and structure — and closer to us than Mars, the current favorite of astronomers looking for life elsewhere in the solar system. Venus is also closer to the Sun, which provides the warmth necessary for life as we know it. In the past, a few scientists have suggested that Venus was a source of primordial life that was later seeded on Earth. That theory, lithopanspermia, never gained popularity because current conditions on Venus seemed very inhospitable to life. The high concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of Venus ensures that the planet has a runaway greenhouse effect that makes its surface incredibly hot, way

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CO2 Incubators Market | Growth of Global Life Science Market to Boost the Market Growth

The global CO2 incubators market size is poised to grow by USD 100.29 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of over 8% throughout the forecast period, according to the latest report by Technavio. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The report also provides the market impact and new opportunities created due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Download a Free Sample of REPORT with COVID-19 Crisis and Recovery Analysis.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201009005417/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global CO2 Incubator Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

Cell culture plays a vital role in cancer research, protein therapeutics, and vaccine production. Also, it is important to maintain a sterile environment and natural condition of these cells while conducting cell culture. This results in an increased demand for

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Apple’s ‘iPhone 12’ event preview, ‘iPhone for life,’ and iOS 14 on the AppleInsider Podcast

We’re all waiting to see the “iPhone 12” at Apple’s “Hi, Speed” event. There’s a possibility for more, though, including a new “HomePod mini,” but maybe also an “iPhone for Life” upgrade plan. Plus we discuss the new features in iOS 14 photos, and remember Steve Jobs, on the AppleInsider podcast.

Apple’s next event titled “Hi, Speed” will be streamed on Tuesday, October 13 at 10 A.M. Pacific on Apple’s US website and YouTube. The rumored “iPhone 12” will likely be announced, alongside possible “AirTags” — though recent rumors suggest not — plus perhaps”AirPods Studio” and a refreshed Apple TV.

Then a recent trademark application made by Apple for the phrase “iPhone for Life” could mean a new type of iPhone upgrade plan for users. We discuss the various ways you can already purchase an iPhone, and the current state of Apple’s promoting upgrades via interest-free Apple Card purchases.

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The first carnival of the animals and Early Palaeozoic marine life

Some of the world’s leading academics are discussing their work in a series of webinars organised by Durham University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

The series, Knowledge Across Borders, will bring together researchers who are outstanding in their fields of expertise to stimulate new, creative and critical thinking, open up new perspectives across cultures, deepen collaboration and share fresh insights.

The webinars will cover areas such as palaeontology, astronomy and science and technology as well as addressing interdisciplinary challenges.

The first webinar will be held on Thursday 29 October and will be presented by leading palaeontologists, Professor David Harper (Durham University) and Professor Renbin Zhan (Chinese Academy of Sciences/Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology).

Titled ‘The first carnival of the animals: Causes and consequences of the diversification of Early Palaeozoic marine life’, they will discuss how life has been evolving on our planet for some four billion years but

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