Why texting is GOOD for your teen: Smartphone addiction may boost children’s mental health

Why texting is GOOD for your teen: Smartphone addiction may boost children’s mental health, research suggests

  • University of California research reveals texting is not as bad as was thought
  • Youngsters cope better with feelings if they express them with friends via text
  • The study shows sharing emotions over text boosts moods among teenagers 

For many parents, it’s a constant struggle to get teenagers off their phones.

But research suggests their smartphone addictions may not be as harmful as previously thought.

Scientists believe texting could actually be good for children’s mental health.

Youngsters cope better with ups and downs if they can express their feelings to friends via messaging services such as WhatsApp, the study found. 

Sharing emotions over text after a demanding event boosted teenagers’ mood, lowered their stress levels

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What The Future Of Work Means For Our Mental Health

The workplace has forever changed.  

In March 2020, more than a third of the world population went into lockdown, and by the end of April 2020, 1.6 billion workers lived in danger of having their livelihoods destroyed.

A full return to “normal” is something that many have begun to realize is unlikely.  Instead, we all must prepare for the “new normal.”

We have already seen an increase in remote work (with a peak of 62% of employed US adults working part or full time from the confines of their home), and a transition of (32%) of companies hiring contingent workers in place of full-time employees, as well as a shift in roles, responsibilities, and expectations alongside a steady incline in leveraging AI (Artificial Intelligence).

But that isn’t the only thing that has changed. 

Covid-19 has put mental health front and center for organizations as the safety of employees becomes

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Researchers suggest providing mental health services to those with the greatest need — ScienceDaily

Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic — such as unemployment — and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the U.S., according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study.

The report appears in Science Advances, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

“The pandemic is not hitting all communities equally,” said lead author E. Alison Holman, UCI professor of nursing. “People have lost wages, jobs and loved ones with record speed. Individuals living with chronic mental and physical illness are struggling; young people are struggling; poor communities are struggling. Mental health services need to be tailored to those most in need right now.”

In addition, the research highlights the connection between mental health and exposure to media coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic, suggesting the need to step away from the television, computer or smartphone to protect

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Pets linked to maintaining better mental health and reducing loneliness during lockdown, new research shows — ScienceDaily

Sharing a home with a pet appeared to act as a buffer against psychological stress during lockdown, a new survey shows.

Most people who took part in the research perceived their pets to be a source of considerable support during the lockdown period (23 March — 1 June, 2020).

The study — from the University of York and the University of Lincoln — found that having a pet was linked to maintaining better mental health and reducing loneliness. Around 90 per cent of the 6,000 participants who were from the UK had at least one pet. The strength of the human-animal bond did not differ significantly between species with the most common pets being cats and dogs followed by small mammals and fish.

More than 90 per cent of respondents said their pet helped them cope emotionally with the lockdown and 96 per cent said their pet helped keep them

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Using Technology To Support Employee Mental Health

Guest post by Martha Neary, Project Manager of One Mind PsyberGuide.

With at least 45 million American adults living with a mental health illness, and many experiencing increasing levels of stress, employers are seeking ways to provide much needed resources and support to their employees. In the world of COVID-19, where additional and unique barriers to care exist such as physical distancing measures that limit contact with providers and the balancing of new work at school schedules from home, many employers are looking to digital resources to support their workplaces and employee wellbeing. Headspace, for example, noted a 500% increase in requests from companies seeking support for their employees’ mental health since March.

Yet there is an overwhelming number of mental health technologies available, and choosing one requires an understanding of the complex landscape. Over 15,000 mental health apps are available on the app stores. Even within the category of

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A new lawsuit may force YouTube to own up to the mental health consequences of content moderation

For big tech platforms, one of the more urgent questions to arise during the pandemic’s early months was how the forced closure of offices would change their approach to content moderation. Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter all rely on huge numbers of third-party contract workers to police their networks, and traditionally those workers have worked side by side in big offices. When tech companies shuttered their offices, they closed down most of their content moderation facilities as well.



a close up of a logo


© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


Happily, they continued to pay their moderators — even those who could no longer work, because their jobs required them to use secure facilities. But with usage of social networks surging and an election on the horizon, the need for moderation had never been greater. And so Silicon Valley largely shifted moderation duties to automated systems.

The question was whether it would work — and

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