Inside the Army’s Fearless, Messy, Networked Warfare Experiment

YUMA PROVING GROUND, Arizona—In the 105-degree heat of the southern Arizona desert, the Army has linked together experimental drones, super guns, ground robots and satellites in a massive test of its future warfare plans. 

On Wednesday, the service mounted the first demonstration of Project Convergence, bringing in some 34 fresh-out-of-the-lab technologies. The goal: to show that these weapons and tools—linked and led by artificial intelligence—can allow humans to find a target, designate it as such, and strike it — from the air, from kilometers away, using any available weapon and in a fraction of the time it takes to execute that kill today. It was an ambitious test that revealed how far Army leaders have come in their goal of networked warfare across the domains of air, land, space and cyberspace. It also provided a vivid picture of how much further the Army has to go.

The scenarios involved different

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Here’s where things stand with the messy TikTok deal

  • TikTok’s deal with Oracle and Walmart is mired in confusion as the app’s parent company ByteDance and the bidders put out conflicting statements. 
  • ByteDance meanwhile has applied for an export license with the Chinese government.
  • And a federal judge has asked the U.S. government whether it will delay an upcoming ban on video-sharing app TikTok or defend its policy in court over the weekend.

The latest developments in the TikTok saga as U.S. app store ban looms

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A federal judge has asked the U.S. government whether it will delay an upcoming ban on the viral video-sharing app TikTok or defend its policy in court over the weekend.

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It’s the latest development in the TikTok saga which has ramped up tensions between China and the U.S. and led to a complicated and fluid deal for the social media app, owned by a Chinese parent

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The messy science behind the coronavirus and opening schools

For example, much attention has focused on whether children transmit COVID-19 as often as adults. This is a difficult question to answer through the types of studies that can be done in most settings. A study from Korea suggested that older children transmitted COVID-19 to people living in their households at rates equal to or higher than adults, and was widely reported as jeopardizing safe school reopening. As in all contact tracing studies, differences in when symptoms appear and when tests are available made it difficult to tell who infected whom in a household. When the authors subsequently reported that the direction of transmission was unknown, raising concern about the conclusions of the original paper, this correction was not widely communicated.

A second recent study was tweeted out by the institution that conducted the research, overstating the findings as demonstrating that children are “silent spreaders” of COVID-19. It was

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