Gaming Monitors, Mice & Headsets

Amazon Prime Day is a big, unwieldy sort of day, but it’s typically a great day to stock up on PC accessories, themselves a big, unwieldy sort of category. There’s always room to tinker with your PC setup, and outside of Black Friday, this is an excellent time to do so. Let’s take a look at Prime Day deals on gaming monitors, mice, headsets and keyboards for example: I’m not trying to be comprehensive, because there’s a ton to work with here.

First I’ll pull out a few options for monitors, and then share some of the best individual deals I’ve seen so far. These include deals for a mouse, keyboard and headset. For more Amazon Prime Day tips, you can see our list of all the best Prime Day deals that went live this morning.


The Best Prime Day Gaming Monitor Deals

LG 34GL750-B 34 Inch 21: 9 Ultragear

Read More

Experimental glioblastoma therapy shows curative powers in mice models — ScienceDaily

Houston Methodist researchers found that mice harboring human glioblastoma tumors in their brains had greatly enhanced survival and weight gain when given a newly developed prodrug. This mitochondrial-targeted prodrug — an inactive compound that cancer cells selectively metabolize to produce an active toxic drug — also greatly improves outcomes when coupled with standard therapies of radiation and/or chemotherapy. The drug selectively targets and destroys the DNA inside the glioblastoma cell mitochondria (the energy factory of the cancer cell) leaving normal cells intact.

In an Oct. 8 study published online in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, investigators used a second generation prodrug called MP-Pt(IV) to target the deadly cells of glioblastoma tumors, a brain cancer that is almost always fatal and has no cure. Life expectancy in humans with glioblastoma ranges from a few months to two years.

Human glioma cells were removed

Read More

Long-legged ‘stilt mice’ wade into streams to hunt aquatic insects using their whiskers — ScienceDaily

Ninety-three years ago, a scientist trapped a mouse in a stream in Ethiopia. Of all the mice, rats, and gerbils in Africa, it stood out as the one most adapted for living in water, with water-resistant fur and long, broad feet. That specimen, housed at Chicago’s Field Museum, is the only one of its genus ever collected, and scientists think it may now be extinct. But in a new study in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, researchers have verified this semi-aquatic mouse’s closest cousins, including two species new to science.

“These two groups of mice have been confused with one another for a century,” says Julian Kerbis Peterhans, one of the paper’s authors and a researcher at the Field Museum who’s studied these rodents for over 30 years. “They’ve been so elusive for so long, they’re some of the rarest animals in the world, so it’s exciting

Read More

These Semi-Aquatic Mice Are as Fascinating as They Are Adorable

Artist’s depiction of Colomys lumumbai, one of two newly described species of semi-aquatic mice.

Artist’s depiction of Colomys lumumbai, one of two newly described species of semi-aquatic mice.
Illustration: Velizar Simeonovski, Field Museum

African rainforests are home to some of the most delightful and surprising species on Earth, as demonstrated by recent research into some rather unusual water-loving rodents.

A study published today in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society describes two species of semi-aquatic mice. Living in the Congo Basin and the western parts of equatorial Africa, these mice make a living by hunting insects and tadpoles while wading through shallow water.

The authors of the new study, led by biologist Tom Giarla from Siena College in New York, did a deep dive into an enigmatic genus of mouse known as Colomys, which translates to “stilt mouse” on account of their elongated feet.

Two of Giarla’s collaborators on the project, Terry Demos and Julian Kerbis Peterhans from the Field

Read More

Biology textbooks may need to be re-written, with scientists finding a new piece of DNA essential to forming male sex organs in mice — ScienceDaily

Biology textbooks may need to be re-written, with scientists finding a new piece of DNA essential to forming male sex organs in mice.

An international research collaboration with The University of Queensland found the Y-chromosome gene that makes mice male is made up of two different DNA parts, not one, as scientists had previously assumed.

UQ’s Institute of Molecular Biosciences Emeritus Professor Peter Koopman said the critical DNA fragment had been hidden from researchers for more than 30 years.

“Expression of the Y chromosomal gene Sry is required for male development in mammals and since its discovery in 1990 has been considered a one-piece gene,” he said.

“Sry turns out to have a cryptic second part, which nobody suspected was there, that is essential for determining the sex of male mice. We have called the two-piece gene Sry-T.”

The scientists tested their theory and found that male mice (XY) lacking

Read More

$1.9 Billion Mice Model Market by Mice Type, Technology, Application, Service, Care Products – Global Forecast to 2025

The “Global Mice Model Market by Mice Type (Inbred, Knockout), Technology (CRISPR, TALEN, ZFN), Application (Oncology, Diabetes, Immunology), Service (Breeding, Cryopreservation, Genetic Testing), Care Products (Cages, Bedding, Feed), and Region – Forecast to 2025” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The global mice model market size is projected to reach USD 1.9 billion by 2025 from USD 1.4 billion in 2020, at a CAGR of 6.4% during the forecast period.

The growth of this market is driven mainly by ongoing innovations in mice models, growing demand for personalized medicine, continuous support in the form of grants and investments, growth in the number of pharmaceutical R&D activities, and increasing focus of associations on the development of embryonic stem cells as well as knockout and mutant mice. Moreover, the popularity of humanized mice models and emerging technologies such as Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) will present lucrative opportunities for

Read More

Transplanted bacteria from sleep-apnea mice caused sleep changes in recipient mice — ScienceDaily

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic sleep condition affecting more than one billion people worldwide. Evidence suggests OSA can alter the gut microbiome (GM) and may promote OSA-associated co-morbidities, including diabetes, hypertension and cognitive problems. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care have discovered how OSA-related sleep disturbances affect the gut microbiome in mice and how transplanting those gut bacteria into other mice can cause changes to sleep patterns in the recipient mice.

David Gozal, MD, the Marie M. and Harry L. Smith Endowed Chair of Child Health at the MU School of Medicine, said the study shows the gut microbiome plays a major role in sleep regulation. This ultimately could translate into treatments that target the gut microbiome in humans with OSA.

“By manipulating the gut microbiome, or the byproducts of the gut microbiota, we would be in a position to prevent

Read More