Biden leads Trump by 6 points in Michigan and Nevada, race tied in Iowa: poll

Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenDemocratic poll shows neck-and-neck race brewing in Florida House district Nebraska district could prove pivotal for Biden in November Bringing Black men back home MORE holds a steady lead over President TrumpDonald John TrumpNorth Korea unveils large intercontinental ballistic missile at military parade Trump no longer considered a risk to transmit COVID-19, doctor says New ad from Trump campaign features Fauci MORE in the key battlegrounds of Michigan and Nevada, while the race remains a dead head in Iowa, according to a new poll.

A CBS News/YouGov tracking poll taken Oct. 6-9 found Trump trailing Biden by six percentage points among registered voters in Michigan and Nevada, 52-46 in both states. In Iowa, both candidates registered support from 49 percent of registered voters.

The polls paint a bleak picture for the president, whose 2016 victory was largely made possible by a narrow win

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The Technology 202: The Michigan kidnapping plot highlights Silicon Valley’s problem with extremism

Social media trails like these are becoming a recurrent feature in violent events ranging from synagogue massacres to bombing plots. 

“Before they become real, they percolate online, courtesy of a social media ecosystem that is ubiquitous, barely moderated and well suited to helping aggrieved people find each other,” my colleagues write. 

Experts in online extremism say the plot exposed by federal and state officials this week highlights the stakes for social media companies to address violent posts on their platform. 

“Social media companies have been allowing these communities to build and grow, ignoring the mounting evidence that memes, posts and images encouraging violence can and do translate into actual violence,” Cindy Otis, a former CIA analyst and vice president of analysis for the Alethea Group, which tracks online threats, told my colleagues. “Not only have many of these Michigan pages and groups been on Facebook for years, the Facebook algorithm

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Even After The Plot To Kidnap Gov. Whitmer, Michigan Militant Groups Continue To Thrive On Facebook

A day after the FBI disclosed that organized armed extremists coordinated on Facebook to hatch a terrorist plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, multiple pages that encourage political violence were still active on the social network.

An examination by BuzzFeed News and the Tech Transparency Project, a nonpartisan watchdog group, found at least five such pages on the platform as of Friday morning. Those pages, which in some cases appear to be simply rebranded versions of previously banned organizations, use Facebook to recruit and to promote objectives that at times call for violent uprising.

Facebook announced in August that it was banning right-wing militant, anarchist, and QAnon groups after a series of violent crimes were tied to organizations that used the platform. Since then, the company has removed thousands of groups, and this week announced it had banned all accounts, pages, and groups tied to QAnon, the collective delusion

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Trump steel tariffs bring job losses to swing state Michigan

CHICAGO(Reuters) – President Donald Trump promised a new dawn for the struggling U.S. steel industry in 2016, and the lure of new jobs in Midwestern states including Michigan helped him eke out a surprise election win.

FILE PHOTO: An entrance to the U.S. Steel Great Lakes Works plant is seen in Ecorse, Michigan, U.S., September 24, 2019. Picture taken September 24, 2019. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook/File Photo

Four years later, Great Lakes Works – once among the state’s largest steel plants – has shut down steelmaking operations and put 1,250 workers out of a job. A year before the June layoffs, plant owner United States Steel Corp called off a plan to invest $600 million in upgrades amid deteriorating market conditions.

Trump’s strategy centered on shielding U.S. steel mills from foreign competition with a 25% tariff imposed in March 2018. He also promised to boost steel demand through major investments in roads,

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Ascension to lay off 223 IT workers in Michigan

Ascension Technologies, the St. Louis-based hospital giant’s information-technology services arm, will lay off more than 200 employees in Michigan.

Ascension last week notified Michigan officials that it plans to eliminate an estimated 223 network operations and service desk jobs in Troy, Mich., between Oct. 24 and Nov. 25.

The health system is outsourcing their responsibilities to an outside vendor, according to Ascension’s notification, which Michigan officials posted online this week.

“Ascension Technologies, after extended discernment and as part of its technology transformation, has made the decision to engage a third-party to perform the work currently performed by employees of the Network Operations Center and Service Desk,” reads the letter, signed by a senior director of human resources at Ascension.

Employees will be able to apply for other positions in Ascension Technologies and with the unnamed vendor, according to the letter. Ascension Technologies will provide severance and outplacement services to those

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Post-Virus Telework: Michigan Considers the Future

More than 300 people tuned in to Government Technology’s Michigan Virtual Digital Government Summit today to hear experts from the public and private sector weigh in on something they’re all familiar with by now: telework. From AT&T, Accenture and the state’s Department of Technology, Management and Budget, speakers interrogated that ubiquitous phrase, “the new normal,” and found a permanently changed landscape after COVID-19 — not only of the workplace but of IT management, planning and opportunities.

In a brief recap of Michigan’s IT efforts to keep state government in business during lockdowns, CIO Brom Stibitz said the state transitioned nearly 30,000 employees to remote work almost overnight in mid-March. This required increasing the number of virtual private networks, boosting Internet service provider bandwidth and demanding a lot of guidance and training from the help desk, Stibitz said, but employees barely missed a beat because it was an acceleration of what

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