Facebook engagement on misleading posts has tripled since 2016.

  • Engagement on Facebook posts from misleading websites has spiked by 242 percent from 3Q of 2016 to 3Q of 2020, according to a new report from German Marshall Fund Digital.
  • Only 10 outlets, which researchers labeled as “False Content Producers” or “Manipulators,” were responsible for 62% of interactions. 
  • Facebook in the past has been slammed by civil rights leaders for inadequately handling the spread of misinformation on its platform.
  • Facebook’s attempts to moderate misinformation on the platform come into focus ahead of the US presidential election. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Engagement from misleading websites on Facebook has tripled since the 2016 US presidential election.

The total number of user interactions with articles from “deceptive outlets” has increased by 242% between the third quarter of 2016 and the third quarter of 2020, according to a study published Monday by the German Marshall Fund Digital, the digital wing of

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Twitter labels Trump tweet on coronavirus immunity as ‘misleading’

A tweet from President TrumpDonald John TrumpNorth Korea unveils large intercontinental ballistic missile at military parade Trump no longer considered a risk to transmit COVID-19, doctor says New ad from Trump campaign features Fauci MORE claiming that he was now “immune” to COVID-19 after his treatment for the virus last week was tagged by the platform as “misleading” on Sunday.

The tweet in question, posted late Sunday morning, stated that the president received a “total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday.”

“That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!” he continued.

The post was hidden several hours later by Twitter content administrators with a tag

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Facebook, Twitter take action over Trump’s misleading COVID-19 posts

(Reuters) – Facebook Inc and Twitter took action on posts from U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday for violating their rules against coronavirus misinformation by suggesting that COVID-19 was just like the flu.

Facebook took the post down but not before it was shared about 26,000 times, data from the company’s metric tool CrowdTangle showed.

“We remove incorrect information about the severity of COVID-19,” a company spokesman told Reuters.

The world’s largest social media company, which exempts politicians from its third-party fact-checking program, has rarely taken action against posts from the Republican U.S. president.

Twitter disabled retweets on a similar tweet from Trump on Tuesday and added a warning label that said it broke its rules on “spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to COVID-19” but that it might be in the public interest for it to remain accessible.

During the 2019-2020 influenza season, the flu was associated with

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Huawei Exec Accuses US Of Misleading Canada In Extradition Case

Chinese Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou and her lawyers returned to a Canadian court on Monday to press for her release, arguing that the United States, by omitting key facts, blatantly misled Canada about her alleged crimes to secure her arrest.

The defense started the five-day hearing by saying that the crux of the US charges against Meng — that she hid Huawei’s relationship with former subsidiary Skycom in Iran from HSBC bank — is false and lacks context.

Meng’s lawyer Scott Fenton accused the United States of having “breached its duty to be forthright and candid.”

“The misstatements (and) omissions in the record of the case,” he told the British Columbia Supreme Court, “go to the very heart of the fraud case.”

As such, he said, the extradition proceedings should be halted.

The Chinese telecom giant’s chief financial officer was arrested on a US warrant in December 2018 during a

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Apple Watch 6’s blood oxygen sensor is unreliable and misleading

An Apple oxygen check a day will not keep the doctor away, at least not yet. The way consumer tech companies are marketing health capabilities is getting ahead of what their gadgets can actually, reliably do. That’s a dangerous trend, and it jeopardizes the potential positive effect that collecting body data could have on our health.

And it’s particularly deceptive at a time when many people are looking to health monitors for any clue that they may have covid-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus.

For the past week, I’ve been wearing a smartwatch on each wrist, all day and all night long. On the right I have the Apple Watch Series 6, and on the left I wear the new $330 Fitbit Sense, which went on sale this week.

There are many reasons that people buy wearable gadgets. I wear an Apple Watch for fitness motivation and to

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