India’s Nirbhay cruise missile test fails

NEW DELHI — The flight test of India’s homemade 1000-kilometer-range cruise missile failed Monday following technical problems.

Nirbhay — an intermediate-range subsonic land-attack cruise missile with terrain hugging — is an Indian version of the American Tomahawk and the Russian Club SS-N-27 cruise missiles.

Defense scientists in India said the test failed within 8 minutes of the launch due to technical issues in the engine. They gave no further details.

The Nirbhay missile is currently powered by the Russian Saturn 50MT turbofan engine. Its local development began in 2007 with the Defence Research and Development Organisation.

A senior DRDO scientist said Nirbhay is a stealthy missile capable of delivering different warheads and is capable of loitering and attacking multiple targets.

“The cruise missiles like Tomahawk and Nirbhay (when successful) do not follow a ballistic parabola but are terrain-hugging in their path. Therefore, they are more difficult to detect by conventional

Read More

US Army hones in on solution for new mid-range missile pursuit

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army’s new pursuit for a mid-range missile will be finalized by the Rapid Capabilities and Critical Technologies Office by the end of the year, the office’s director told Defense News in an interview ahead of the Association of the U.S. Army’s annual conference.

The service has set a goal to field the chosen missile in less than three years — by the fourth quarter of fiscal 2023 — which means it can’t start from scratch, said Lt. Gen. James Thurgood.

“You might be able to take something that’s in the [science & technology] world already and do something with it,” he said. ” You might be able to take an existing joint service program and do something with it. There are lots of opportunities. I don’t think that ’23 is an unrealistic outcome.”

The RCCTO received the mission in July following a strategic fires study conducted

Read More

North Korea unveils new ballistic missile during military parade

North Korea unveiled what appeared to be a new intercontinental ballistic missile during a military parade on Saturday night, though it is unclear whether the weapon is functional or built for show, according to the New York Times.

Why it matters: If it does work, analysts say it would be North Korea’s largest long-range missile to date, potentially able to fly further and carry a more powerful nuclear warhead than the country’s previous ICBMs.

  • It not known whether the missile has been flight-tested.

The big picture: The technology demonstrates that the country has improved its missile and nuclear innovation despite pressure from the United States, international sanctions, typhoons and the coronavirus pandemic.

  • “What North Korea has shown us, what appears to be a new liquid-fueled ICBM that seems to be a derivative of what was tested back in late 2017, known as the Hwasong-15, is much bigger and clearly more
Read More

SpaceX Wins Contract to Make US Missile Tracking Satellites

They might be based on Starlink.

Grow Your Business, Not Your Inbox

Stay informed and join our daily newsletter now!


2 min read


This story originally appeared on Engadget

SpaceX continues to get cozier with the US military. The private spaceflight outfit has won a Space Development Agency contract (via Space News and The Verge) to build missile warning and tracking satellites for the Defense Department. The roughly $149.2 million deal will have SpaceX build low Earth orbit vehicles with “wide field of view” infrared sensors that can monitor potential threats and help cue missile defense systems.

SDA director Derek Tournear told Space News the satellites in SpaceX’s bid were a new design, but based on the existing bus from Starlink broadband models. It’s obtaining the infrared sensor from an unnamed supplier.

L3 Harris won a similar contract for about $193.6 million. The SDA hopes to

Read More

Treasury Sanctions Key Actors in Iran’s Nuclear and Ballistic Missile Programs



U.S. Department of the Treasury

September 21, 2020

Action taken in support of the re-imposition of UN sanctions on Iran lifted under UNSCR 2231

WASHINGTON – Today, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) sanctioned three Deputy Directors of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) and a number of its subsidiaries. Companies supplying equipment for Iran’s ballistic missile production overseen by Iran’s Aerospace Industries Organization (AIO) and senior officials working on Iran’s missile programs have also been designated. Today’s actions by Treasury, the Department of State, and the Department of Commerce target entities and personnel directly involved in Iran’s nuclear, ballistic missile, and conventional arms programs.

“The Trump Administration remains fully committed to its maximum pressure campaign against the Iranian regime to prevent the production of a nuclear weapon and other malign activities,” said Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin. “The Treasury Department will not hesitate

Read More