MIT Sloan Management Review Announces in One of the Largest Ever Studies of Corporate Culture the 2020 Culture Champions

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and MILL VALLEY, Calif., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today, MIT Sloan Management Review announced the 2020 Culture Champions, as determined by the Culture 500, a groundbreaking study that scientifically compares the corporate cultures of more than 500 of the largest companies driving the U.S. economy.

The Culture Champions list comes out of the Culture 500, a large-scale, interactive research study conducted by researchers at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Studying over 1.4 million Glassdoor reviews from more than 500 of the largest employers in the United States, the Culture 500 is notable for its large scale — it is one of the largest studies of corporate culture ever conducted — and use of groundbreaking AI technology developed at MIT to make sense of over a million employee reviews.

The standout organizations in the study, the 21 Culture Champions were recognized because their employees

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MIT Technology Review Hosts CyberSecure Online Conference Dec 2-3, 2020

CyberSecure speakers bring cross-industry perspectives on nation-state hackers, cyber-resiliency strategies, holistic risk management, and the path toward a zero-trust future. They represent a curated selection of researchers, information security specialists, and leaders experienced in preventing and responding to cybercrime attacks. They include:

  • MK Palmore, Field Chief Security Officer | Palo Alto Networks
  • John Hultquist, Senior Director, Intelligence Analysis | FireEye
  • Jamil Farshchi, Chief Information Security Officer | Equifax
  • Alissa Abdullah (Dr. Jay), Deputy Chief Security Officer | Mastercard
  • Edna Conway, VP Global Security, Risk & Compliance, Azure | Microsoft Corporation
  • Aaron Cockerill, Chief Strategy Officer, Chief Strategy Officer | Lookout
  • Halvor Molland, Senior Vice President | Norsk Hydro ASA
  • Ben Buchanan, Director, Cyber AI Project | Georgetown University
  • Kimberly Grauer, Head of Research | Chainanalysis

CyberSecure presenting partners include Darktrace, a world leader in AI cybersecurity that specializes in threat detection, investigation, and

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MIT researchers and collaborators work to prepare manufacturers for future crises | MIT News

At the beginning of the Covid-19 crisis, the state of Massachusetts assembled a manufacturing emergency response team as part of its efforts to respond to the desperate need for personal protective equipment (PPE), particularly masks and gowns. The Massachusetts Emergency Response Team (M-ERT) — aided by MIT faculty, students, staff, and alumni — helped local manufacturers produce more than 9 million pieces of PPE as well as large volumes of hand sanitizer, disinfectants, and test swabs.

Building on the experiences and knowledge gained through the work of M-ERT, a new project, which was recently awarded funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), is developing a network collaboration model designed to help ecosystems organize and enable manufacturers to rapidly “pivot,” in an emergency, from producing their standard products to producing PPE or other urgently needed goods. Elisabeth Reynolds, executive director of the MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future

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Milo Phillips-Brown receives inaugural MAC3 Society and Ethics in Computing Research Award | MIT News

Milo Phillips-Brown, a postdoc in the ethics of technology in MIT Philosophy, was recently named the inaugural recipient of the MAC3 Society and Ethics in Computing Research Award, which provides support to promising PhD candidates or postdocs conducting interdisciplinary research on the societal and ethical dimensions of computing.

Phillips-Brown is being recognized for his work teaching responsible engineering practices to computer scientists. At MIT, he teaches two courses, 24.131 (Ethics of Technology) and 24.133 (Experiential Ethics), and has been an active participant in the activities of the Social and Ethical Responsibilities of Computing (SERC), a new cross-cutting area in the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing that aims to weave social, ethical, and policy considerations into the teaching, research, and implementation of computing.

“We are delighted to be able to work so closely with Milo,” says Julie Shah, an associate professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, who

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MIT physicists inch closer to zero-emissions power source

Sept. 29 (UPI) — For the last few years, scientists at MIT have been working on a fusion research experiment called SPARC and, according to a series of papers — published Tuesday in the Journal of Plasma Physics — the research is going quite smoothly.

The research effort, a collaboration between MIT and startup company Commonwealth Fusion Systems, is intended to pave the way for an emissions-free power plant — a fusion reactor.

According to the latest updates, scientists have yet to encounter any unexpected hurdles. What’s more, researchers characterized the remaining challenges as manageable.

Over the last 2 1/2 years, researchers on the project have focused on working out the physical principles underlying their planned fusion reactor. So far, the work has confirmed the validity of the plasma physics behind their SPARC plans.

“These studies put SPARC on a firm scientific basis,” Martin Greenwald, researcher at the MIT Plasma

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Industry and scientific leaders examine Covid-19-era inequities, emphasize rapid testing | MIT News

“Covid-19 is both a wildfire and a spotlight. [It] has imposed a terrible burden of suffering on certain individuals, families, and communities. Yet it has left others almost untouched,” said President L. Rafael Reif at the inaugural MIT Forefront, a new virtual series created by the Institute. “But the pandemic has also forced the nation to focus on deep, longstanding inequalities. [T]oday, we will explore meaningful ways to disrupt the inequalities of Covid.”

 Through MIT Forefront, the Institute aims to scout the frontiers of science and technology for bold new answers to urgent global problems. On Sept. 24, the first session, “Disrupting the Inequalities of Covid-19 in Work and Health Care,” brought business and policy leaders and MIT experts together to share knowledge and discuss strategies for building a more equitable future.

The hourlong event, viewed live by more than 1,000 people, began with a video from Mariana Matus PhD

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National Science Foundation Convergence Accelerator awards two grants to MIT | MIT News

Two grants have been awarded to MIT researchers on the themes of socio-resilient infrastructure, and on the future of oceans. The grants are part of the U.S. National Science Foundation Convergence Accelerator program, designed to foster global cross-disciplinary and cross-sector workshops on emerging areas of critical societal importance. The NSF Convergence Accelerator program further aims to accelerate use-inspired, convergence research via partnerships between academic and non-academic stakeholders.

Socio-resilient infrastructures

The Socioresilient Infrastructure: Precision Materials, Assemblages, and Systems project is co-led by Christine Ortiz, the Morris Cohen Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and Ellan Spero, a historian of science and technology and instructor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. This project will engage leading researchers from around the world to advance an intellectual framework for socio-resilient infrastructure, where social resilience is considered to be the ability of human communities to cope with and adapt to stresses and shocks

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MIT Engineers Have Created a Completely Flat Fisheye Lens

Illustration for article titled This Perfectly Flat Fisheye Lens Could Help Shave Down Camera Bumps

Image: Felice Frankel/MIT

Fisheye lenses make for some cool photos, but their most distinctive feature is that the glass is curved. The need for multiple bits of curved glass makes fisheye lenses both bulky and expensive. However, engineers at MIT and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell have figured out a way to make a fisheye lens that’s completely flat and could be applied in consumer devices, medical applications, and more.

The method of flattening something that is known for being bubble-like is pretty clever. To do it, the engineers used something called a “metalens,” or a flat piece of glass measuring just a millimeter thick. On the back of the metalens, they then carved teeny structures to scatter incoming light in a way that produces the same type of ultrawide, panoramic images a fisheye lens would. More specifically, the metalens is made from a transparent piece of calcium

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