Future biosensor for continuous monitoring using molecular lookalikes

Future biosensor for continuous monitoring using molecular look-alikes
Credit: Eindhoven University of Technology

Biosensors measure the concentration of molecules in biological samples for biomedical, environmental, and industrial applications, and, ideally, they should provide real time, continuous data. However, the continuous monitoring of small molecules at low concentrations is problematic. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have developed an innovative sensing approach based on molecular lookalikes. This could prove pivotal in future biosensors for monitoring health and disease.


The field of biosensors has a rich and inventive history. The “father of biosensors” is seen by many to be Leland C. Clark Jr., who designed a sensor to measure oxygen in blood in the early 1960s.

However, as happens in pioneering works, things didn’t start out as he had hoped. His initial sensor designs failed because blood components affected the sensing electrode.

Clark’s solution was to separate the electrode and the blood by a cellophane wrapper from a cigarette packet,

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Unveiling common molecular mechanisms of parasitism and grafting — ScienceDaily

Using the model Orobanchaceae parasitic plant Phtheirospermum japonicum, scientists from Nagoya University and other research institutes from Japan have discerned the molecular mechanisms underlying plant parasitism and cross-species grafting, pinpointing enzyme β-1,4-glucanase (GH9B3) as an important contributor to both phenomena. Targeting this enzyme may help control plant parasitism in crops. Also, this mechanism can be exploited for novel cross-species grafting techniques to realize the goal of sustainable agricultural technologies.

Plant parasitism is a phenomenon by which the parasite plant latches onto and absorbs water and nutrients from a second host plant, with the help of a specialized organ called the “haustorium.” Once the haustorium forms, specific enzymes then help in forming a connection between the tissues of the parasite and host plants, known as a “xylem bridge,” which facilitates the transport of water and nutrients from the host to the parasite.

A similar mechanism is involved in the process

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Researchers use artificial intelligence language tools to decode molecular movements

UMD researchers use artificial intelligence language tools to decode molecular movements
Scientists from the University of Maryland applied a language processing system to the movements of a riboswitch molecule pictured here, to understand how and when the molecule takes different forms. Credit: Zachary Smith/UMD

By applying natural language processing tools to the movements of protein molecules, University of Maryland scientists created an abstract language that describes the multiple shapes a protein molecule can take and how and when it transitions from one shape to another.


A protein molecule’s function is often determined by its shape and structure, so understanding the dynamics that control shape and structure can open a door to understanding everything from how a protein works to the causes of disease and the best way to design targeted drug therapies. This is the first time a machine learning algorithm has been applied to biomolecular dynamics in this way, and the method’s success provides insights that can also help advance

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Nano-scientists develop a molecular tool to change the structure of a metal surface — ScienceDaily

The surface of metals plays a key role in many technologically relevant areas, such as catalysis, sensor technology and battery research. For example, the large-scale production of many chemical compounds takes place on metal surfaces, whose atomic structure determines if and how molecules react with one another. At the same time, the surface structure of a metal influences its electronic properties. This is particularly important for the efficiency of electronic components in batteries. Researchers worldwide are therefore working intensively on developing new kinds of methods to tailor the structure of metal surfaces at the atomic level.

A team of researchers at the University of Münster, consisting of physicists and chemists and led by Dr. Saeed Amirjalayer, has now developed a molecular tool which makes it possible, at the atomic level, to change the structure of a metal surface. Using computer simulations, it was possible to predict that the restructuring of

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Point of Care (PoC) Molecular Diagnostics Market Is Booming

Point of Care (PoC) Molecular Diagnostics Market

Global Point of Care (PoC) Molecular Diagnostics Market 2020-2030 by Product (Assays, Instruments, Software), Technology (PCR, INAAT, Microarray), Application, End User, and Region: Trend Forecast and Growth Opportunity , Covid 19 Outbreak Impact research report added by Report Ocean, is an in-depth analysis of market characteristics, size and growth, segmentation, regional and country breakdowns, competitive landscape, market shares, trends and strategies for this market. It traces the market’s historic and forecast market growth by geography. It places the market within the context of the wider Point of Care (PoC) Molecular Diagnostics market, and compares it with other markets., market definition, regional market opportunity, sales and revenue by region, manufacturing cost analysis, Industrial Chain, market effect factors analysis, Point of Care (PoC) Molecular Diagnostics market size forecast, market data & Graphs and Statistics, Tables, Bar &Pie Charts, and many more for business intelligence. Get

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Findings shed light on how hearing happens at the molecular level — ScienceDaily

We hear sounds in part because tiny filaments inside our inner ears help convert voices, music and noises into electrical signals that are sent to our brains for processing. Now, scientists have mapped and simulated those filaments at the atomic level, a discovery that shed lights on how the inner ear works and that could help researchers learn more about how and why people lose the ability to hear.

The findings, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, involve very fine filaments in the inner ear called tip links. When sound vibrations reach the inner ear, the vibrations cause those tip links to stretch and open ion channels of sensory cells within the inner-ear cochlea, a tiny snail-shaped organ that allows our brains to sense sound. When tip links open those channels, that act triggers the cochlear electrical signals that we interpret as sound.

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Likely molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis are revealed by network biology

covid-19
Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

Viral and bacterial pathogens wield pathogenic or virulent proteins that interact with high-value targets inside human cells, attacking what is known as the host interactome. The host interactome is the network map of all the protein-protein interactions inside cells.


Such networks have been studied in organisms as diverse as plants, humans and roundworms, and they show a similarity to social networks like Facebook or airline route maps. In Facebook, a few people will have a huge number of friend connections, some will have many, and a vast majority will have much fewer. Similarly, airlines have a few hubs that many passengers pass through on the way to their destinations.

Host interactomes show a limited number of high-powered hubs—where a protein has a large number of connections—and a limited number of important bottlenecks, which are sites with a large number of short paths to a node. These

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Chemists make cellular forces visible at the molecular scale — ScienceDaily

Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level. Nature Methods published the work, led by chemists at Emory University, who demonstrated their technique on human blood platelets in laboratory experiments.

“Normally, an optical microscope cannot produce images that resolve objects smaller than the length of a light wave, which is about 500 nanometers,” says Khalid Salaita, Emory professor of chemistry and senior author of the study. “We found a way to leverage recent advances in optical imaging along with our molecular DNA sensors to capture forces at 25 nanometers. That resolution is akin to being on the moon and seeing the ripples caused by raindrops hitting the surface of a lake on the Earth.”

Almost every biological process involves a mechanical component, from cell division to blood clotting to mounting an

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Point of Care Molecular Diagnostics Market revenue to cross USD 2.8 Bn by 2026: Global Market Insights, Inc.

Major point of care (PoC) molecular diagnostics market players include Bio-Rad Laboratories, Abbott Laboratories, Sysmex, Danaher, Vircell.

Selbyville, Delaware, Sept. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —

According to latest report “PoC Molecular Diagnostics Market by Technology (PCR, In Situ Hybridization, Sequencing, Isothermal Amplification), Application (Infectious Disease, {Flu, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Tuberculosis (TB), HIV, Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis B}, Oncology, Hematology), End-use (Hospitals, Clinics), Regional Outlook, Price Trends, Competitive Market Share & Forecast 2026”, by Global Market Insights, Inc., the market valuation of point of care (PoC) molecular diagnostics will cross $2.8 billion by 2026. Strategic initiatives for developing innovative PoC molecular diagnostics assays and instruments will accelerate the market growth.

Point of care molecular diagnostics tests deliver several benefits from enhancing patient care to limiting healthcare expenditure. High-quality diagnostic tests are widely available in developed countries, while developing economies face a shortage of high-quality diagnostic tools. Therefore, there

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