A Life on Our Planet Nails the Planetary Problems But Misses the Political Ones

David Attenborough is 93. Over the course of his lifetime, the beloved natural historian and broadcaster has seen the planet go through unimaginable changes. Atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases have soared, as has the human population, while biodiversity has declined precipitously. He details these shifts in a new documentary released on Netflix on Sunday, which he calls his “witness statement” for the natural world.



David Attenborough wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: David Attenborough in the new film David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet.


© Screenshot: Netflix (Getty Images)
David Attenborough in the new film David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet.

The new film, David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet, beautifully and persuasively argues in favor of a fundamental reshaping of humanity’s relationship with nature. But in doing so, it misses something more subtle: the fact that not all of humanity are equally responsible for exploiting Earth.

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That’s not to say it’s not well worth a watch. The new movie is both deeply moving and

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SpaceX launches Earth-observation satellite for Argentina, nails rocket landing

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX successfully launched an Earth-observation satellite for Argentina along with two small piggyback satellites today (Aug. 30). 



a body of water with smoke coming out of a lake: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the SAOCOM 1B Earth-observation radar satellite for Argentina and two small rideshare payloads launches into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Aug. 30, 2020.


© Provided by Space
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the SAOCOM 1B Earth-observation radar satellite for Argentina and two small rideshare payloads launches into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Aug. 30, 2020.

The trio blasted off from Space Launch Complex 40 here at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 7:18 p.m. EDT (2318 GMT). 

A used two-stage Falcon 9 rocket carried the SAOCOM-1B satellite aloft, marking the company’s 15th launch of 2020. Approximately nine minutes after liftoff, the booster’s first stage produced some dramatic sonic booms as it made its way back to terra firma, touching down at SpaceX’s Landing Zone-1 (LZ-1) at Cape Canaveral.   

Related: See the evolution of SpaceX’s rockets in pictures

Today’s flight was the fourth launch for this particular

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