A new, more trusting style of leadership is needed to manage people working from home, says tech exec

  • Tech company Splunk has more than 6,000 staff working from home and has adapted to a more trusting style of leadership.
  • Splunk is training leaders and managers to understand employees’ needs as they work remotely, according to its Chief Technical Adviser James Hodge.
  • Having people work from home also means companies have access to a wider talent pool, Hodge said.

LONDON — When the coronavirus pandemic closed workplaces earlier this year, businesses effectively went from having one or more locations to having as many offices as they did employees, as staff worked from home.

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For software company Splunk, this effectively meant going from 35 offices to more than 6,000 “overnight,” according to the firm’s Chief Technical Adviser James Hodge. Having so many people working at home has meant a more trusting style of leadership is necessary, Hodge told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Monday.

“The first few months

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How the U.S. fights forest fires and why innovation is needed

Some of the largest wildfires ever recorded are raging across the west. Millions of acres have burned in California, Oregon and Washington. Smoke has reached as far as Europe. 

Firefighters like Michael Seaton, who lost his home in the deadly 2018 Camp Fire, have worked more than a month straight.

“So you’re out on the line for two days and you’re sleep deprived out there. So I’ve seen people standing up with their eyes closed and they’re basically asleep,” said Seaton, a CAL FIRE engineer.

“All of this is on the heels of wildfire emergencies in 2019, 2018 and 2017 that points to the pattern of how climate warming is predisposing large landscapes to unprecedented fire activity,” said Doug Morton, Chief of NASA’s Biospheric Sciences Laboratory.

Heat waves and drought have left a thick layer of dry vegetation easily sparked by people and lightning. Although nearly 85% of wildland fires

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Protection needed for emerging mining hotspots

Protection needed for emerging mining hotspots
Mining hotspots identified by the researchers on world map. Credit: University of Queensland

Growing demand for metals necessary for the transition to a low carbon future will lead to more mining in high-risk areas, according to University of Queensland research.


Dr. Éléonore Lèbre and researchers from UQ’s Sustainable Minerals Institute identified mining “hotspots” by looking at areas where competition over mining resources such as water and land is likely to negatively impact surrounding communities.

“Past research has raised concerns about the environmental, social and governance pressures that come from increased mining but they have never assessed the risks on a global scale using quantitative data,” Dr. Lèbre said.

“By applying seven categories of risk—three environmental, three social and one governance indicator—we were able to map where these mining hotspots would exist and the metals involved. All the metals we analyzed are necessary for the transition to a low-carbon future. Some

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New education ‘hubs’ for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close

New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said.

Special schools for Deaf children have had an important role in the Deaf community, acting as places people can meet and learn BSL together. But the move to inclusive education and new technology such as cochlear implants means most children with hearing loss are now educated in mainstream schools.

Deaf education should be remodelled to replace the role previously provided by specialist schools which have closed, Dr Hannah Anglin-Jaffe argues in a study in the British Education Research Journal.

Dr Anglin-Jaffe proposes Deaf education and support could be run in the same way as existing community provision in schools and other social spaces such as libraries or community centres. These hubs could act as a new iteration of the special school for the Deaf and host

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To reach the Paris climate goals, decade-long measures are needed — ScienceDaily

Based on current data measured in the energy, industry, and mobility sectors, restrictions of social life during the corona pandemic can be predicted to lead to a reduction of worldwide carbon dioxide emissions by up to eight percent in 2020. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), cumulative reductions of about this magnitude would be required every year to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement by 2030. Recent measurements by researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) revealed that concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has not yet changed due to the estimated emission reductions. The results are reported in Remote Sensing (DOI: 10.3390/rs12152387).

The corona pandemic has changed both our working and our private lives. People increasingly work from home, have video conferences instead of business trips, and spend their holidays in their home country. The lower traffic volume also reduces CO

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How do we know AI is ready to be in the wild? Maybe a critic is needed

Mischief can happen when AI is let loose in the world, just like any technology. The examples of AI gone wrong are numerous, the most vivid in recent memory being the disastrously bad performance of Amazon’s facial recognition technology, Rekognition, which had a propensity to erroneously match members of some ethnic groups with criminal mugshots to a disproportionate extent. 

Given the risk, how can society know if a technology has been adequately refined to a level where it is safe to deploy?

“This is a really good question, and one we are actively working on, “Sergey Levine, assistant professor with the University of California at Berkeley’s department of electrical engineering and computer science, told ZDNet by email this week. 

Levine and colleagues have been working on an approach to machine learning where the decisions of a software program are subjected to a critique by another algorithm within the same program

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