Newly found dinosaur fossils shed light on toothless, two-fingered species

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Here’s a look at what the Oksoko avarsan dinosaurs might have looked like way back when.


Michael W. Skrepnick

Newly discovered fossils of a toothless, parrot-like dinosaur species that lived more than 68 million years ago reveal a creature with two fingers on each forearm. That’s one less digit than its close dino relatives had. 

The fossils imply that the dinosaurs may have evolved forelimb adaptations that enabled them to spread during the Late Cretaceous Period, researchers say in a new study published Wednesday in The Royal Society Open Science journal. Paleontologists from the University of Edinburgh found a number of complete skeletons of the new species during a dig in Mongolia’s Gobi Desert. 

The feathered, omnivorous Oksoko avarsan grew to around 6.5 feet (2 meters) long. In addition to two functional digits on each

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Newly Discovered ‘Extreme’ Alien Planet Is Super Hot At 5,800 Fahrenheit, Researchers Reveal

KEY POINTS

  • CHEOPS has released the results of its observation on alien planet WASP-189b
  • WASP-189b’s orbit is tilted dramatically and orbits its star every 2.7 Earth days
  • WASP-189b has temperatures reaching 5,800 Fahrenheit

The European Space Agency’s Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite (CHEOPS) has recently discovered an alien planet about 1.6 times the size of Jupiter. Aside from having a strange orbit, it is also scorching hot.

WASP-189b, the newly discovered alien planet, was first detected in 2018 and has been recorded to have temperatures reaching 5,800 Fahrenheit — almost as hot as Earth’s outer core and is even hot enough to turn iron into gas, ESA’s study revealed.

Aside from having a size comparable to Jupiter, the exoplanet is also considered a “Hot Jupiter” due to its extremely short orbital period (2.7 Earth days). A Hot Jupiter is a gas planet with a “Jupiter-like” size that orbits very close to its

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5 things Texas Tech fans need to know about Kansas State, including a newly improved QB

These two teams could not be coming off of more different games in the week before. Kansas State heads into the game coming off a comeback win over No. 3 Oklahoma, while Texas Tech is coming off a game where… Well, you all know what happened.

Here are five things Texas Tech fans need to know about Kansas State:

Skylar Thompson can throw

Historically, the Kansas State offense hasn’t been like most other Big 12 offenses in terms of its productivity through the air. The Wildcats have only had one QB throw for at least 2,000 yards in the last five seasons: Skylar Thompson last year (2,315 yards).

Through two games the senior quarterback has thrown for 593 yards and three touchdowns. He’s the best quarterback this team has had in several years, probably since Collin Klein. Thompson isn’t flashy but he knows how to operate within this offense.

Baskets

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Genetic testing cost effective for newly diagnosed GIST — ScienceDaily

Because gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are sensitive to the targeted small molecule therapy imatinib, oncologists tend to treat all patients with metastatic GIST with this drug. However, because this rare type of cancer is caused by different genetic mutations, imatinib does not help all patients equally.

To determine whose cancer may be most responsive, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network suggests that patients undergo genetic testing to identify each individuals’ tumor mutations. And yet, only 30 percent of patients have genetic testing at the time of diagnosis, likely due to concerns over cost and utility of testing, said Jason Sicklick, MD, professor of surgery in the Division of Surgical Oncology at University of California San Diego School of Medicine.

“We recommend that all patients with a new diagnosis of metastatic GIST undergo genetic testing prior to the initiation of first-line chemotherapy,” said Sicklick, surgical oncologist and co-leader of the Sarcoma Disease

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EY Blockchain Analyzer features newly enhanced Explorer & Visualizer solution to investigate on-chain data

– Facilitates analysis of blockchain activities such as cryptocurrency transactions

– Designed to support management of legal, compliance and fraud risks

– Beta version available free for individual use on blockchain.ey.com

LONDON, Sept. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — EY today announced the availability of a new Explorer & Visualizer solution, an expansion of the EY Blockchain Analyzer product suite, beta version available free for individual use and soon to be available as-a-service on blockchain.ey.com. The Explorer & Visualizer solution integrates search functionality with visualization technology, allowing users to explore, track and analyze in-depth patterns and trends for on-chain data which could support management of legal, compliance and fraud risks.

EY - Building a better working world (PRNewsFoto/EY) (PRNewsfoto/EY)
EY – Building a better working world (PRNewsFoto/EY) (PRNewsfoto/EY)

The Explorer & Visualizer solution makes it possible for internal audit teams and forensics accountants to search for specific transactions, addresses and blocks to gather relevant information. The initial release supports Bitcoin,

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Newly identified ‘landfalling droughts’ originate over ocean — ScienceDaily

Meteorologists track hurricanes over the oceans, forecasting where and when landfall might occur so residents can prepare for disaster before it strikes. What if they could do the same thing for droughts?

Stanford scientists have now shown that may be possible in some instances — the researchers have identified a new kind of “landfalling drought” that can potentially be predicted before it impacts people and ecosystems on land. They found that these droughts, which form over the ocean and then migrate landward, can cause larger and drier conditions than droughts that occur solely over the land. Of all the droughts affecting land areas worldwide from 1981 to 2018, roughly one in six were landfalling droughts, according to the study published Sept. 21 in Water Resources Research.

“We normally don’t think about droughts over the ocean — it may even sound counterintuitive. But just as over land, there can be times

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A newly discovered asteroid will pass close to Earth on Thursday

Discovered only on September 18, in Tucson, Arizona, the school bus-sized asteroid which is estimated to be somewhere between 15-30 feet in diameter is expected to graze past our planets surface with about 13,000 miles of breathing room. This falls well below the orbit of our geostationary weather satellites which are located about 22,000 miles above earth’s surface.

Its closest approach to earth will occur around 7:12 a.m. ET on Thursday, as it skirts over the Southeastern Pacific Ocean, near Australia and New Zealand.

Its approach will be so close to earth, that our gravity will alter its speed and trajectory according to earthsky.org.

“There are a large number of tiny asteroids like this one, and several of them approach our planet as close as this several times every year,” said Paul Chodas, director of the Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.… Read More