Norwegian Group Katapult Ocean Invests in ecoSPEARS Environmental Startup With NASA Clean Water Technology

ORLANDO, Fla., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — ecoSPEARS understands that toxins are polluting land and waterways. When these contaminants remain in the environment, they can cause congenital disorders and diseases to animals and people.ecoSPEARS develops climate-friendly technology solutions to remove the toxins from the environment, so everyone has access to clean water, clean food, and clean air. 

In the selection process, Katapult Ocean screened and interviewed a pipeline with more than 1,500 startups. Since 2018, Katapult Ocean has made 32 investments in exciting ocean impact companies from all over the world (17 countries and four continents). “Few options exist when it comes to eliminating persistent and emerging contaminants in soil, sediment, and oil – a problem which has grown with industry globally. ecoSPEARS is well-positioned to become the benchmark cleantech company for green remediation,” said Jonas Skattum Svegaarden, CEO of Katapult Ocean. 

ecoSPEARS imagines a world where every

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The Atlantic Ocean Hasn’t Been This Hot in at Least 2,900 Years

Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station.

Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station.
Photo: NASA (Getty Images)

More than 20 years after intoning, “The water’s getting warm, so you might as well swim,” Smash Mouth’s “All Star” continues to be prophetic. Case in point: A new study finds that the Atlantic Ocean just had its hottest decade in at least 2,900 years. Someone award Smash Mouth a PhD and calculate the h-index of their discography immediately.

The new findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, rely on a mix of ice and sediment cores as well as thermometer data to track the state of the Atlantic. The ocean has gone through a well-known up-and-down swing in sea surface temperature, known as the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation. Plotted over hundreds of years, the AMO looks like a pretty steady wave pattern. In its warm phase, it

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3,500-pound great white shark dubbed “Queen of the Ocean” spotted off North America’s coast

A 3,500 pound great white shark dubbed Nukumi — meaning “Queen of the Ocean” — has been spotted off the coast of Nova Scotia. The massive 50-year-old shark was tagged and released by Ocearch, a research and exploring team that hopes its latest trip out to sea provides new clues to unravel the mysteries of great whites.

“When you see these big females like that that have scars from decades over their lives and multiple mating cycles, you can really kinda see the story of their life unfolding across all the blotches and healed wounds on their body,” team leader Chris Fischer told CBS News’ Jeff Glor. “It really hits you differently thank you would think.”   

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A 50-year-old, 3,500-pound shark nicknamed Nukumi, meaning “Queen of the Ocean.”

CBS News/Ocearch


Tagging Nukumi, one of the largest great white sharks ever seen, was the crowning achievement of Ocearch’s month-long trip off

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Future ocean conditions could cause significant physical changes in marine mussels

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IMAGE: Marine mussels are commonly used to monitor water quality in coastal areas
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Credit: University of Plymouth

The increased temperature and acidification of our oceans over the next century have been argued to cause significant physical changes in an economically important marine species.

Scientists from the University of Plymouth exposed blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) to current and future levels of ocean acidification (OA) or warming (W), as well as both together – commonly known as OAW.

Initial comparison of mussel shells showed that warming alone led to increased shell growth, but increasing warming and acidification led to decreased shell growth indicating that OA was dissolving their shells.

However, analysis using cutting edge electron microscopy of the shell crystal matrix or ‘ultrastructure’ revealed that, in fact, warming alone has the potential to significantly alter the physical properties of the mussels’ shells, whereas acidification mitigated some of the

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Huge ‘queen of the ocean’ great white shark tagged offshore of Nova Scotia

Huge 'queen of the ocean' great white shark tagged offshore of Nova Scotia
Huge ‘queen of the ocean’ great white shark tagged offshore of Nova Scotia

OCEARCH is a non-profit organization that focuses on the research of the “ocean’s giants”. The team has just discovered an approximately 50-year-old great white shark off the coast of Nova Scotia.

Using the hashtag #FactsOverFear, the company shares important data discovered by their research. Nukumi’s story is an example of how their work goes beyond the data.

On Saturday, OCEARCH shared that “We named her ‘Nukumi’, pronounced noo-goo-mee, for the legendary wise old grandmother figure of the Native American Mi’kmaq people.”

Nukumi is 1,606 kilograms and almost 5.25 metres long. OCEARCH shared a video of the extrodinary tagging process:

Embedded content: https://www.facebook.com/OCEARCH/videos/965072050628797/

The team tracks the sharks to learn about their migration patterns and uncover overall new shark-related information.

Chris Fischer, founding chairman and expedition leader, shared that he was “awestruck” when he was next to Nukumi.

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Researchers find ‘Queen of the Ocean’ ancient great white shark off Nova Scotia coast

Researchers off the coast of Nova Scotia found a nearly 2-ton great white shark believed to be roughly 50 years old, dubbing her a true “Queen of the Ocean.”

Coming in at more than 17 feet long and 3,541 pounds, she is the largest shark the group has been able to sample in the Northwest Atlantic, according to a Friday Facebook post by OCEARCH, a non-profit marine research organization. She’s been named Nukumi for “the legendary wise old grandmother figure” of the Indigenous Mi’kmaq people, a First Nations group native to that region of Canada.

Chris Fischer, the OCEARCH expedition leader, called Nukumi a “proper Queen of the Ocean” in a video log posted Saturday.

“She’s probably 50-years-old and certainly her first litters of pups she would have been having 30 years ago are also making babies, really humbling to stand next to a large animal like that,” Fischer said.

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PlanetCare’s Laundry Filter Helps Stop Ocean Plastic Pollution

Getting microplastics out of laundry

Illustrator: Cathryn Virginia

Mojca Zupan was a corporate lawyer doing just fine—“comfort-zone-fine,” as she puts it—in 2016, when a museum exhibit changed her life.

The Plastic Garbage Project depicts the “the origins, life cycle, sense, and senselessness of plastic products.” “I saw these big microscopic pictures of microfibers,” Zupan says of the tiny grains of plastic that slough off synthetic textiles and seep into bodies of water. “It’s ridiculous. Washing machines pollute so heavily.”

Explore dynamic updates of the earth’s key data points

She did some research. Technically, a solution for catching microfibers existed. But awareness of the issue was low. “I didn’t get the feeling that something would be done about it in the near future,” Zupan says. “I became determined to change the washing machine industry.” Within a year, Zupan had started PlanetCare and begun selling the company’s first product, a filter that

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Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities

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IMAGE: Examples of normally formed (a, c) and malformed (b, d) specimens of E. huxleyi (above) and R. clavigera (below) observed in the mesocosm samples
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Credit: ICTA-UAB

A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification.

The research, recently published in the journal Scientific Reports of Nature, shows that some of the major environmental changes projected for this century in the Mediterranean Sea (e.g., ocean acidification, ocean warming, and the increasingly frequent marine heatwaves in summer) can have adverse effects on the productivity of calcifying phytoplankton communities (coccolithophores).

Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by human activities have alarmingly increased in the past decades. A quarter of this anthropogenic CO2 has been absorbed by the

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Briny Underground Lakes May Be All That Remain of Martian Ocean | Smart News

When scientists first found signs of a lake under Mars’ south pole in 2018, questions abounded over how such a feature could form and whether the measurements were accurate. Now, a study published this week in Nature Astronomy not only confirms the size and location of the first lake, but also shows three more, smaller bodies of water nearby.

The study adds 100 measurements to the team’s original 29 figures for a clearer picture of the region. The four lakes are hidden a mile under the surface of Mars’ icy south pole, and may be full of salt and sediments to remain liquid even in extreme cold temperatures. Some scientists not involved in the study are cautious about the research team’s conclusions, but the study authors see the discovery as an optimistic signal in the search for life on Mars.

“Here we have not just an occasional body of water,

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Increasing stability decreases ocean productivity, reduces carbon burial — ScienceDaily

As the globe warms, the atmosphere is becoming more unstable, but the oceans are becoming more stable, according to an international team of climate scientists, who say that the increase in stability is greater than predicted and a stable ocean will absorb less carbon and be less productive.

Stable conditions in the atmosphere favor fair weather. However, when the ocean is stable, the layers of the ocean do not mix. Cooler, oxygenated water from beneath does not rise up and deliver oxygen and nutrients to waters near the surface, and warm surface water does not absorb carbon dioxide and bury it at depth.

“The same process, global warming, is both making the atmosphere less stable and the oceans more stable,” said Michael Mann, distinguished professor of atmospheric sciences and director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State. “Water near the ocean’s surface is warming faster than the water

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