Exercise intensity not linked to mortality risk in older adults, finds trial — ScienceDaily

Exercise intensity appears to make no difference to risk of mortality among older adults, suggests a randomised controlled trial from Norway published by The BMJ today.

Physical activity has been highlighted as one of the most important actions people of all ages can engage in to improve health, and data from observational studies show that early death is significantly reduced in physically active compared with inactive individuals.

Yet high quality clinical trial evidence on a potential direct (causal) relation between current advice on physical activity levels and longevity is lacking.

So an international research team set out to evaluate the effect of five years of supervised exercise training compared with recommendations for physical activity on mortality in older adults (70-77 years).

The trial involved 1,567 participants (790 women and 777 men) living in Trondheim, Norway, with an average age of 73 years. In total, 87.5% of participants reported overall good

Read More

How Technology Is Improving Access And Empowering Older Adults To Embrace Telehealth

COVID-19 has greatly changed how we care for ourselves and has resulted in a massive change to how we connect with our doctors. Providers are seeing 50-175 times the number of patients via telehealth visits than they did before the pandemic, and Forrester predicts that virtual care visits will soar to more than 1 billion by the end of 2020, including 900 million visits related to the coronavirus.

Telehealth has great potential to increase healthcare access for everyone during the pandemic, and this is especially important for older adults and other populations at higher risk of contracting COVID-19. But, virtual visits can also be stressful for those with an aversion to using technology to speak with their doctor.

As patients who might’ve shied away from technology in the past now need to use it to connect with their doctors, it’s important for healthcare providers to ensure their telemedicine platforms

Read More

A lot of older Macs won’t be able to watch 4K Netflix this fall because of a missing chip

macOS Big Sur, Apple’s upcoming release of its Mac operating system, will finally let you watch 4K HDR Netflix content, but it turns out it’ll only work on 2018 or later Macs with Apple’s T2 security chip, according to a new Netflix support document (via Apple Terminal).

That means the full list of Macs that can watch 4K content on Netflix, at least for now, is as follows:

  • iMac (2020)
  • iMac Pro
  • Mac Pro (2019)
  • Mac mini (2018)
  • MacBook Air (2018 or later)
  • MacBook Pro (2018 or later)

There’s an easy way to check whether your Mac has a T2 chip, as Apple points out on its website.

Disappointingly, older iMacs and pre-2018 Mac laptops that could theoretically play Netflix 4K content, whether on their built-in displays or via an 4K or 5K external monitor, won’t be able to. It’s not clear why the T2 security chip is required:

Read More

Delirium a key sign of COVID-19 in frail, older people — ScienceDaily

A new analysis of data from researchers at King’s College London using information from the COVID Symptom Study app and patients admitted to St Thomas’ Hospital in London, has shown that delirium — a state of acute confusion associated with a higher risk of serious illness and death — is a key symptom of COVID-19 in frail, older people.

The findings, published in the journal Age and Ageing, highlight that doctors and carers should be aware of delirium as a possible early warning sign of COVID-19 in the elderly, even in the absence of more typical symptoms such as cough or fever.

Led by clinical fellow and geriatrician Dr Rose Penfold at King’s College London, the researchers analysed data from two groups of older people aged 65 or over from March through May. The first group included 322 patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 who had tested positive for

Read More

Can wearable technology help older adults maintain healthy lives?

apple watch
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Older adults who are physically activity are more likely to remain healthy and maintain their independence. Research indicates that self-tracking of physical activity supports healthy living for people of all ages, but older adults have been slower to adopt new technologies like movement trackers. A new project funded by the National Science Foundation will examine how to leverage wearable technology to encourage older adults to be more active.

David Conroy, professor of kinesiology and human development and family studies at Penn State, is collaborating with a team of leading researchers from the University of Maryland’s College of Information Studies (iSchool) in this study. The project team is developing innovative wearable technology tailored to track the movements and activities of older adults, age 60 and over. Combined with the development of teachable interfaces, the project aims to enhance the motivation of older adults to engage in physical

Read More