OnePlus 8T Review: One of the Best Phones You Shouldn’t Buy

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OnePlus 8T Review: One of the best phones you shouldn’t buy

“The OnePlus 8T is a great smartphone — great software, speedy, and a decent camera. Except at $749, the competition around it is too strong for it to be a hearty recommendation.”

  • Superfast charging
  • One day’s use after 15 minutes charge
  • Clean, fast, and up-to-date software
  • Attractive photos from the camera
  • No wireless charging
  • No IP water-resistance rating

The unassuming OnePlus 8 has been replaced by the OnePlus 8T. Wait, you don’t remember the OnePlus 8? That’s not surprising, as the phone was a safe, sensible choice that had absolutely no standout features, making it entirely forgettable. The OnePlus 8T also makes you forget, but this time it makes you forget about charging, because its big new feature completely removes any worry about making sure you have a fully charged phone each morning.

Think that’s the whole story? It’s

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Review: ‘Billion Dollar Loser,’ by Reeves Wiedeman

Neumann spun an origin myth about growing up on a kibbutz in Israel, where he appreciated the community but bristled at how everyone was rewarded the same regardless of how much work they put in. He envisioned WeWork, he said, as a “capitalist kibbutz”—a “community,” but the kind where “you eat what you kill.”

Wiedeman (with whom I overlapped while working at The New Yorker) presents a more nuanced portrait of the founder as a young man. Neumann was born in 1979 in Beersheba, Israel, to physician parents who shuttled Neumann and his sister around desert towns before moving to the suburbs of Tel Aviv. When he was in the second grade, his grandmother realized that he couldn’t read the menu at a restaurant; he was dyslexic. “He had become skilled at fooling his teachers and coaxing others to do what he needed,” Wiedeman writes. After his parents divorced

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MIT Sloan Management Review Announces in One of the Largest Ever Studies of Corporate Culture the 2020 Culture Champions

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and MILL VALLEY, Calif., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today, MIT Sloan Management Review announced the 2020 Culture Champions, as determined by the Culture 500, a groundbreaking study that scientifically compares the corporate cultures of more than 500 of the largest companies driving the U.S. economy.

The Culture Champions list comes out of the Culture 500, a large-scale, interactive research study conducted by researchers at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Studying over 1.4 million Glassdoor reviews from more than 500 of the largest employers in the United States, the Culture 500 is notable for its large scale — it is one of the largest studies of corporate culture ever conducted — and use of groundbreaking AI technology developed at MIT to make sense of over a million employee reviews.

The standout organizations in the study, the 21 Culture Champions were recognized because their employees

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Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro review: a seriously powerful Android smartphone

The Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro is another flagship-level phone from the Chinese manufacturer, as it looks to gain even more market share outside of its home country. It follows on from the superb Xiaomi Mi 9T Pro from last year, and fits alongside the other Mi 10 phones of 2020.

It’s not a terribly easy range to figure out – there are several different-but-similar Mi 10 phones to pick from, with and without the T attached (though the T denotes the newer models), and then there are the Note models to take into consideration as well…

It’s perhaps easier to look at the prices to understand where each phone sits in the Xiaomi Mi 10 range. This Mi 10T Pro hasn’t been given a UK price (or launch date) yet, but costs €599 in European markets – that works out at roughly £545, so mid-to-upper-range pricing.

That’s a very reasonable

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Many things to many people: Panasonic launches DC-BGH1 modular ‘box’ camera: Digital Photography Review

Panasonic has announced a new Micro Four Thirds video camera, the Lumix DC-BGH1. This box-style camera is built around a 10.2MP Live MOS sensor. Based on specs, the BGH1 might appear to be essentially a Panasonic GH5S minus the screen and controls, and to some degree, it is. Still, Panasonic has included several features that are rather interesting.

The aluminum and magnesium alloy body is relatively small, at 93mm per side and 78mm deep (3.66 x 3.07 inches). Notably, the camera lacks both a viewfinder and a screen but includes eleven 1/4″-20 sockets for mounting accessories or a tripod. An integrated fan and internal heat dispersion system allow for unlimited record times, and a hot shoe mount on top of the camera can be used to mount a microphone or Panasonic’s DMW-XLR1 XLR adapter.

Camera controls include a dial with a four-way controller on top, several dedicated function buttons and

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Research review determines aerosol-generating procedures that require enhanced personal protective equipment — ScienceDaily

Autopsy, airway suctioning and cardiopulmonary resuscitation are among the list of medical procedures that pose a risk of spreading COVID-19 from a patient to their health-care provider by creating aerosols, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Respiratory Research by an international team of experts including occupational health, preventive medicine and infectious disease specialists.

The team, led by University of Alberta medicine professor Sebastian Straube, carried out a systematic review of public health guidelines, research papers and policy documents from around the globe to determine which procedures are classified as aerosol-generating.

“What we sought to do was to understand which procedures generate aerosols and therefore require a higher grade of personal protective equipment,” said Straube, who also heads the preventive medicine division of the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.

“Where there is 80 per cent agreement from a number of different source documents, we are reasonably confident

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Teracube 2e Review – A More Affordable Sustainable Smartphone

Teracube’s slogan is “Better for your pocket, better for the planet”.  In this Teracube 2e review we do a deeper dive to see if it lives up to the affordable yet sustainable smartphone slogan.

AndroidHeadlines did an early read on this device on launch day. I have been using the Teracube 2e for a little over a week in preparation for this review.

Before we dig into the Teracube 2e review let’s take a look at the company’s philosophy and why they believe their approach is more beneficial to the environment.

Earth and Environment Friendly

Smartphones’ biggest environmental impact comes from the manufacturing process and the e-waste when discarded. According to Teracube, in the U.S. alone, over 151 million cell phones are thrown into landfills every year. To help combat this, the Teracube 2e was designed to help reduce e-waste and smartphone turnover.

Teracube’s devices are good for the environment

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Tech review: Samsung Galaxy S20 FE might be the flagship smartphone for these trying times, Reviews News & Top Stories

With the Covid-19 pandemic still raging and the economy battered, many consumers are likely to be tightening their purse strings.

Perhaps keeping that in mind, Samsung has delivered a “lite” flagship smartphone – the Galaxy S20 FE 5G. This “Fan Edition” gets a $800 price cut from the flagship S20 Ultra ($1,898) launched in March.

This means Samsung had to shed some features from the S20 Ultra. The phone comes with 8GB of system memory (instead of 12GB found in the S20 Ultra), a lower-resolution display (2,400 x 1,080 pixels instead of 3,200 x 1,400 pixels), a plastic rear (instead of Gorilla Glass) and an optical in-display fingerprint sensor (instead of an ultrasonic one).

The camera also gets a downgrade. The S20 FE features a rear triple-camera system instead of S20 Ultra’s quad-camera system that comprises a high-resolution 108-megapixel (MP) wide-angle camera. The S20 FE’s telephoto camera has only a

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‘The Silence,’ by Don DeLillo book review

The story takes place in 2022. In the opening pages, Jim and his wife, Tessa, are flying home to New York from a vacation in Paris. Hours of sitting have made them both tedious. “In the air,” DeLillo writes, “much of what the couple said to each other seemed to be a function of some automated process, remarks generated by the nature of airline travel itself.” Jim rambles; his wife humors him. They are “filling time. Being boring” — re-created here with distressing verisimilitude.

Suddenly, the passengers hear “a massive knocking somewhere below them.” Turbulence shakes the plane hard. Panicked voices blare over the intercom. As the chapter ends, Tessa asks, “Are we afraid?”

The novel picks up in a New York apartment where Diane and Max, a long married couple, are waiting for their friends to arrive from Paris for a Super Bowl party. So far, the only guest

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Opinion: Camera names are getting ridiculous: Digital Photography Review

Canon’s EOS 5D Mark II changed the camera industry forever. In more ways than one.

Looking back, I can’t honestly say I recognized the long-term impact of Canon’s big announcement at Photokina 2008. It’s only with hindsight I can see the significance of the unveiling of the EOS 5D Mark II.

It ushered in the era of Full HD video in DSLRs: that was obviously a big deal. But it was also the herald of an insidious trend in consumer cameras whose enormity is only now becoming clear.

At the time it seemed innocent enough. After all, the ‘Mark II’ was an iteration on an existing design. Sure the whole video thing meant that the second-gen model was arguably even more significant than the original ‘first-sub-$4000 full frame digital’ EOS 5D, but that ‘Mark II’ branding seemed logical, given how much it appeared to have been developed from its forebear.

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