Opening of Canton Tower Science & Technology Conference 2020: Exploring the Services and Missions of Technology

GUANGZHOU, China, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — With the support of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology and the Guangzhou Municipal People’s Government, Canton Tower Science & Technology Conference 2020 – The Global Mobile Developers Conference and AI Summit Forum, hosted by IDG Asia and co-organized by Guangzhou Municipal Science and Technology Bureau, was again in Guangzhou from Oct. 13 to 14, 2020.

The theme of this Conference is “Intelligence Everywhere · Imagine Endless”, showing people’s higher reliance and expectations for science and technology. Because technology brings an unprecedented sense of security and sense of gain during the pandemic period, people are all the more convinced that technology may create better well-being and a better life in the future.

Therefore, this Conference is a brainstorming of ideas to explore the services and missions of science and technology. Over 200 guests from governments, international organizations, enterprises, technology communities

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In Science We Trust – Rolling Stone

In a world reeling from the Covid-19 pandemic, the role of science has been brought into sharp focus. Chief scientific advisors, epidemiologists and infectious disease experts have become household names around the world; all hopes pinned on pioneers of modern medicine to provide the escape route: a vaccine. We are guzzling up information with newfound gusto, hungry for the facts of science over the disorientation of hearsay, rumor and rhetoric.

Yet, this spotlight on science is more an anomaly than a normality in the wider context. Society still isn’t embracing the full potential of science. Opportunities built on the foundations of scientific understanding to advance humanity are being missed.

Unlike questions raised over policies, laws, and opinion, science only ever speaks in evidence and data. Used well it can cut through the minefield of opinions and lay the groundwork for forward-thinking decisions. More urgently than ever, it’s time for decision-makers

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OSU alumna honored for work in science and technology | News

STILLWATER – Oklahoma State University alumna and Cherokee Nation citizen Dr. Cara Cowan Watts will be recognized Saturday with the Ely S. Parker Award, the highest honor awarded by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society.

Watts will receive the award during the American Indian Science and Engineering Society national conference – which is being held virtually – for her contributions and achievements in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

“I believe our tribal nations and Oklahoma both win when STEM careers and degrees are valued and embraced by more people rather than fewer,” she said.

Cowan Watts has followed her own advice. The three-time OSU graduate earned her bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering in 1997, a master’s degree in telecommunications management in 2002, and a doctorate in biosystems engineering in 2015.

In 2001, she and her brother, Brett, established a scholarship fund for Native American engineering students in their parents’

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The new line of attack on climate science in the age of megafires

Every morning, wildland firefighters gather around radios to listen to the weather forecast. This summer, I was part of the team that fought a fire near Big Sur. When I heard the staticky voice announce that temperatures would exceed 105 degrees, the forecast sounded like a death sentence.



a close up of clouds in front of a sunset: The August Complex fire burns near Lake Pillsbury in the Mendocino National Forest on Sept. 16. By Oct. 5, it had burned more than 1 million acres. (Noah Berger/Associated Press )


© (Noah Berger / Associated Press)
The August Complex fire burns near Lake Pillsbury in the Mendocino National Forest on Sept. 16. By Oct. 5, it had burned more than 1 million acres. (Noah Berger/Associated Press )

Across California, unprecedented heat has made wildfires more difficult to predict and control. During the heat wave in Big Sur, the fire, which had been 40% contained at 30,000 acres, tripled in size in a matter of days. It has now burned nearly 125,000 acres.

Fighting wildfire involves hauling heavy packs and tools up mountains. Record heat makes this work more difficult and dangerous. After

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Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science | News

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Tufts University School of Engineering is collaborating with Noodle Partners, a leading online program manager (OPM), to launch a new online Master of Science in Data Science program and a Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. The programs are expected to launch in January 2021 with classes beginning in Fall 2021. 

“We are laser focused on building online programs that help meet the growing demand for data and computer scientists.”

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA

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Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in

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Morgan Awarded $1.2 Million in Federal Science, Tech Grants

(Photos Courtesy of Morgan State University)

Morgan State University Obtains $1.2 Million in Federal Science, Technology Grants

NSF and NIH Funding Boosts Morgan’s School of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

BALTIMORE — Morgan State University’s (MSU’s) School of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences (SCMNS) has announced the receipt of four federal grants totaling more than $1.2 million, awarded in the spring and summer of 2020. The funds are supporting important research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields ranging from pharmatechnology to advanced computing to meteorology to computer science instruction. Collectively, the grants indicate steady progress toward Morgan’s goal of attaining an R1 (“very high research”) designation from the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. MSU was elevated to an R2 (“high research”) Carnegie classification in December 2018.

“Receiving four grants by four different faculty members testifies to the quality of the faculty and their devotion to the

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CNN launches new series ‘Saved by the Future’ with leading names in science and technology exploring the innovations that will shape our future | Nachricht

HONG KONG, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — This month, CNN launches ‘Saved by the Future’, a brand-new cross-platform series in which some of the biggest names in science and technology spotlight breakthrough innovations in mobility, automation, energy, sustainability and artificial intelligence that could transform our lives in decades to come.

In the first of three 30-minute shows, host Nicki Shieldsguides conversations with Bill NyeFabien Cousteau and Kathy Sullivan, who transport us to a world of future possibilities that once seemed like mere science fiction, in everything from mobility in space to electric drones that can predict the weather.

Shields first speaks with TV Star “The Science Guy”, climate change advocate and social media sensation Bill Nye about the future of space exploration. Nye is CEO of the Planetary Society, which successfully launched its LightSail 2 spacecraft in 2019. The spacecraft is powered by solar winds

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Jennifer Doudna, New Nobel Laureate, on Science and Covid

Good morning.

Last week, Nobel Prize season arrived.

Among the several winners with ties to California were two Stanford professors — Paul R. Milgrom and Robert B. Wilson, were awarded the Nobel in economic science — and three University of California scholars. Reinhard Genzel, a U.C. Berkeley professor emeritus of physics and astronomy, and Andrea Ghez, a U.C.L.A. professor of astrophysics, shared the prize in physics with a mathematician at Oxford University for their work on black holes.

And Jennifer Doudna, a U.C. Berkeley professor, shared the prize in chemistry with Emmanuelle Charpentier, now the director of the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin, for their work on Crispr-Cas9, a method to edit DNA.

[See the full list of 2020 Nobel winners and read more coverage here.]

It’s the first time the award has gone to two women, and Dr. Doudna is the first woman

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How a 2nd-Grade Class Sent a Science Experiment to Space

Back in 2015, students in Maggie Samudio’s second-grade class at Cumberland Elementary School in West Lafayette, Ind., were contemplating an offbeat science question: If a firefly went to space, would it still be able to light up as it floated in zero gravity?

Ms. Samudio said she would ask a friend of hers, Steven Collicott, an aerospace professor at nearby Purdue University, for the answer.

“He teaches a class on zero gravity, and he would be the perfect person to answer the question,” Ms. Samudio recalled in an email.

A day later, Dr. Collicott replied, and Ms. Samudio was surprised by his answer: Instead of guessing, why not actually build the experiment and send it to space?

Blue Origin, the rocket company started by Jeffrey P. Bezos, chief executive of Amazon, was planning to offer the ability for schools to fly small experiments on its New Shepard suborbital spacecraft for

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