Unknown Oppo smartphone gets FCC certified with triple cameras



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Oppo seems to be preparing to launch new smartphones; this can be seen after one of their devices has received certification from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The FCC has certified an Oppo phone that comes with the model number CPH2185. The identity of this new Oppo smartphone is still a mystery, but the FCC provides us with some information about it.

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Scientists characterize previously unknown gut reactions — ScienceDaily

Strictly speaking, humans cannot digest complex carbohydrates — that’s the job of bacteria in our large intestines. UC Riverside scientists have just discovered a new group of viruses that attack these bacteria.

The viruses, and the way they evade counterattack by their bacterial hosts, are described in a new Cell Reports paper.

Bacterioides can constitute up to 60% of all the bacteria living in a human’s large intestine, and they’re an important way that people get energy. Without them, we’d have a hard time digesting bread, beans, vegetables, or other favorite foods. Given their significance, it is surprising that scientists know so little about viruses that prey on Bacteroides.

“This is largely unexplored territory,” said microbiologist Patrick Degnan, an assistant professor of microbiology and plant pathology, who led the research.

To find a virus that attacks Bacteroides, Degnan and his team analyzed a collection of bacterial genomes, where viruses can

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Zebrafish embryos elucidate unknown effect for cercosporamide — ScienceDaily

Researchers in the group of Jeroen den Hertog, in collaboration with researchers in Leiden, have found that a compound inhibits a group of proteins called BMP receptors. This compound, called cercosporamide, was previously only known to inhibit a different group of proteins. When overactive, BMP receptors can induce several diseases. Studying compounds that may counteract this overactivity may lead to more treatment options in the future. Their results were published in the scientific journal Disease Models & Mechanisms.

Fungi

We constantly need new therapeutic compounds for use in the clinic for various reasons, including our increasing age, corresponding illnesses and resistance to existing drugs. Fungi are an excellent, but underexplored source of these kinds of compounds. Researcher Jelmer Hoeksma explains: “Every year new compounds produced by fungi are identified, but so far we have only investigated a very small subset of all existing fungi. This suggests that many more

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ISS successfully dodges ‘unknown piece of space debris’

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The ISS has to watch out for space junk.


NASA

With space junk piling up around our planet, the International Space Station needed to perform a last-minute avoidance maneuver Tuesday to steer clear of an “unknown piece of space debris expected to pass within several kilometers.”

Mission Control in Houston conducted the move at 2:19 p.m. PT using the Russian Progress resupply spacecraft docked to the ISS to help nudge the station out of harm’s way. 

“Out of an abundance of caution, the Expedition 63 crew will relocate to their Soyuz spacecraft until the debris has passed by the station,” NASA said in a statement prior to the move. 

The maneuver went off smoothly, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine reported. “The astronauts are coming out of safe haven,” he tweeted after the ISS relocated.

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The ISS just avoided a ‘piece of unknown space debris’

An unknown piece of space debris was detected near the International Space Station, NASA said yesterday. The station executed an “avoidance maneuver” on Tuesday night to get out of the way of the debris, boosting its orbit around Earth. “At no time was the crew in any danger,” NASA wrote in a blog post.

Thrusters on an uncrewed Progress cargo ship attached to the station were used to boost the station’s orbit, according to NASA. During the maneuver, the astronauts on board the station moved into the Russian segment so that they’d be closer to the Soyuz passenger spacecraft. Once the 150-second-long maneuver was over, the crew went back to their normal activities.

It’s not clear yet what the space debris was, but NASA said that flight controllers in Houston were tracking the object with assistance from US Space Command. At one point, it was expected to come within 1.39

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