Study shows surge of emergency room visits since introduction of rideshare e-scooters — ScienceDaily

A Henry Ford Health System physician is sounding the alarm on the rising number of injuries caused from riding electric scooters, calling it a growing public health concern.

In a study of e-scooter injuries, Kathleen Yaremchuk, M.D., chair of the Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, says a review of emergency visits in the last three years shows e-scooter injuries have increased significantly with many of them related to head and neck injuries. The study describes how the types of injuries which include concussions, fractures, contusions and abrasions, lacerations and internal organ injuries have changed since the introduction of e-scooter rideshare systems to the public in September 2017.

The study’s break down on the type of injuries shows that head and neck injuries made up nearly 28% of the total injuries. Results were also broken down by age groups and showed that from 2009 to 2017, patients who

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Mars At Its Brightest Since 2003 As Moon Visits Venus. What You Can See In The Night Sky This Week

Each week I pick out the northern hemisphere’s celestial highlights (mid-northern latitudes) for the week ahead, but be sure to check my main feed for more in-depth articles on stargazing, astronomy and eclipses. 

What To Watch For In The Night Sky This Week: October 12-18, 2020

This week it’s all about Mars, which will look its biggest, brightest and best in post-sunset skies since 2018 and, technically speaking, since 2003.

However, it’s also a week where the Moon wanes towards its New phase, meaning dark skies at night, gorgeous crescents in the early pre-dawn mornings early in the week, and in early evenings from Sunday. 

MORE FROM FORBESWhat’s That Really Bright ‘Star’ In The Night Sky?

Tuesday, October 13, 2020: Mars at opposition

Tonight the red planet reaches opposition,

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Surgeons find that shifting to virtual visits could be a way to improve patient-centered care, satisfy busy patients — ScienceDaily

Surgical patients who participate in virtual follow-up visits after their operations spend a similar amount of time with surgical team members as those who meet face-to-face. Moreover, these patients benefit by spending less time waiting at and traveling to the clinic for in-person appointments, according to research findings presented at the virtual American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2020.

“I think it’s really valuable for patients to understand that, in the virtual space scenario, they are still going to get quality time with their surgical team,” said lead study author Caroline Reinke, MD, FACS, associate professor of surgery at Atrium Health in Charlotte, N.C. “A virtual appointment does not shorten that time, and there is still an ability to answer questions, connect, and address ongoing medical care.”

Due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the widespread adoption of technology, many surgical patients are being offered virtual appointments in

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Army Secretary visits Austin to unveil latest partnership between military and Texas

AUSTIN (Nexstar) — An autonomous, four-legged robot led the Army Secretary around the University of Texas’ flagship campus Friday, as the school highlighted its military partnerships with the unveiling of its robotics lab.

The facility, a collaboration between UT Austin and Army Futures Command, formally opened with a ribbon cutting Friday, though the advancements in technology have been long-worked on by researchers at The Forty Acres.

Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy, Gov. Greg Abbott and Army Futures Command General John M. Murray joined UT Austin President Jay Hartzell for the announcement.

“It’s not simply about a specific project or mission,” Hartzell said. “It’s about our full commitment to developing a technological advantage for the defense of our nation.”

On a tour of the robot lab, Army leadership saw dozens of demonstrations, including tele-surgery equipment for remote medical operations, quadruped robots to help search for targets and vehicles that make adjustments based

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Increase of 123 percent occurred during a time when VCU Medical Center was experiencing a lower-than-average number of overall visits — ScienceDaily

In a paper published Friday by the Journal of the American Medical Association, Virginia Commonwealth University researchers released data showing an alarming surge in opioid-related overdoses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Nonfatal opioid overdose visits to the VCU Medical Center emergency department in Richmond increased from 102 between March and June 2019 to 227 between March and June 2020. That’s an increase of 123%.

The overdose increase occurred during a time when the emergency room was experiencing a lower-than-average number of visits overall. March through June visits in 2020 were down 29% from the same time last year.

The study’s lead author, Taylor Ochalek, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow at the VCU C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research, analyzed the 2019 and 2020 data from VCU Medical Center’s emergency department.

“Social isolation, job loss, the inaccessibility of community resources — these could all contribute to

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