How Innovative AI Solutions Can Help Combat Global Warming

Ashok, CEO of UnfoldLabs, is an innovation veteran who believes in making the world a better place with futuristic technology products.

Australian researchers have suggested a 2050 scenario of doomsday for humanity.

Climate change is the biggest and toughest global problem humanity faces today. Global warming requires innovation from the brightest and the best. Our scientists have turned to artificial intelligence (AI) for the best possible solutions because it is easy to proactively predict and build models immediately. Top leaders like Google, IBM, and Intel have launched many pilot projects that read, analyze and suggest the right solutions to save our planet from global warming.

Here are some prominent and innovative AI projects to combat global warming.

1. Warm Oceans

The arctic has lost 80% of its volume of ice since 1979 and is melting at the fastest rate ever. Due to the melting glaciers, the rising sea levels

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American Pikas show resiliency in the face of global warming — ScienceDaily

The American pika is a charismatic, diminutive relative of rabbits that some researchers say is at high risk of extinction due to climate change. Pikas typically live in cool habitats, often in mountains, under rocks and boulders. Because pikas are sensitive to high temperatures, some researchers predict that, as the Earth’s temperature rises, pikas will have to move ever higher elevations until they eventually run out of habitat and die out. Some scientists have claimed this cute little herbivore is the proverbial canary in the coal mine for climate change.

A new extensive review by Arizona State University emeritus professor Andrew Smith, published in the October issue of the Journal of Mammalogy, finds that the American pika is far more resilient in the face of warm temperatures than previously believed. While emphasizing that climate change is a serious threat to the survival of many species on Earth, Smith believes

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Nights are warming faster than days. Here’s what that means for the planet.

Climate change can have profound impacts across ecosystems, but rising average temperatures are just one factor among many driving those repercussions. A new study published in late September in Global Change Biology found that nighttime temperatures are increasing at a faster rate compared to daytime temps in most land areas across the Earth. That shift can influence everything from predator-prey dynamics to plant growth.



Nighttime ecology is particularly understudied, with most research focused on the daytime activities of organisms.


© Provided by Popular Science
Nighttime ecology is particularly understudied, with most research focused on the daytime activities of organisms.

“Climate change is already messing things up,” says Daniel Cox, an ecologist at the University of Exeter and lead author of the study. “But the 24-hour asymmetry is adding an extra dimension of complexity [for species].”

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Previous analyses have found that the rising greenhouse gases in our atmosphere are not having an even effect on temperatures from day to night. But Cox says this

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Climate-friendly cooling to help ease global warming

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Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A new IIASA-led study shows that coordinated international action on energy-efficient, climate-friendly cooling could avoid as much as 600 billion tons CO2 equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions in this century.


Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are mainly used for cooling and refrigeration. While they were originally developed to replace ozone-depleting substances that are being phased out under the Montreal Protocol, many HFCs are potent greenhouse gases with a global warming potential up to 12,400 times that of CO2 over a 100-year period.

The Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol, which entered into force in 2019, aims to phase down the consumption of HFCs by 2050. While previous agreements have resulted in improvements in the design and energy performance of, for instance, cooling equipment, the Kigali Amendment is the first to include maintaining and/or enhancing the energy efficiency of cooling technologies as an explicit goal. According to the

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Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities

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IMAGE: Examples of normally formed (a, c) and malformed (b, d) specimens of E. huxleyi (above) and R. clavigera (below) observed in the mesocosm samples
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Credit: ICTA-UAB

A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification.

The research, recently published in the journal Scientific Reports of Nature, shows that some of the major environmental changes projected for this century in the Mediterranean Sea (e.g., ocean acidification, ocean warming, and the increasingly frequent marine heatwaves in summer) can have adverse effects on the productivity of calcifying phytoplankton communities (coccolithophores).

Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by human activities have alarmingly increased in the past decades. A quarter of this anthropogenic CO2 has been absorbed by the

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Are China’s pollution remediation efforts making the planet warmer? China’s efforts to combat aerosol pollution resulted in warming throughout the northern latitudes — ScienceDaily

A 10-year effort by China to improve air quality and reduce pollution-related health risks has caused warming in areas across the northern hemisphere, according to new work published in Environmental Research Letters.

Aerosols are tiny particles that are spewed into the atmosphere by human activities, such as burning coal and wood, or by geological phenomena, like volcanos. Their negative effects on air quality can damage human health and agricultural productivity.

Similar to how the aerosols emitted in a volcanic eruption can cause global temperatures to drop, some aerosols from human activity also have a cooling effect on the climate. Unlike greenhouse gases, which induce global warming by trapping heat in the atmosphere, aerosol particles can cause sunlight to be reflected away from the planet either directly or by interacting with clouds.

“This means that some of the effects of global warming are being masked by aerosol pollution,” explained lead

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Global ocean waters could speed warming, become less suitable for life

The reduced up and down mixing is expected to have sweeping implications beyond just accelerating global warming. It is projected to increase energy available to hurricanes and other storms, reduce essential nutrients for fish in upper ocean layers and diminish the oceans’ ability to store carbon, among other impacts.

The study assesses how the separation of seawater layers, known as stratification, has changed based on new temperature, salinity and density data. It finds substantial shifts have occurred as the ocean has absorbed more heat in the upper 6,500 feet of water.

The study, from researchers in China as well as the United States, found stratification has increased by about 5.3 percent during the 1960 to 2018 period, for a rate of 0.9 percent per decade.

The way the ocean layers are separated is similar to a basic vinaigrette salad dressing, where lighter oil sits at the top, and more dense

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Severe marine heat waves linked to human-caused warming

Unusually hot zones in the ocean likely will become longer, more frequent.

This is an Inside Science story.

The scientists, led by postdoctoral researcher Charlotte Laufkötter at the University of Bern in Switzerland, focused on seven well-documented marine heat waves from the past decade. For each hot spell, they calculated the relative probabilities that a similar event could have occurred with and without human influence. They found that human activities such as greenhouse gas emissions made the heat waves much more likely

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Enhanced warming subtropical ocean is expanding the tropics — ScienceDaily

The severe droughts in the USA and Australia are the first sign that the tropics, and their warm temperatures, are apparently expanding in the wake of climate change. But until now, scientists have been unable to conclusively explain the reasons for this, because they were mostly focusing on atmospheric processes. Now, experts at the AWI have solved the puzzle: the alarming expansion of the tropics is not caused by processes in the atmosphere, but quite simply by warming subtropical ocean.

Forest fires in Australia and California, droughts and water shortages in the Mediterranean — in the last few years, events such as these have become more frequent. Researchers attribute this to the fact that the tropics, the warm region surrounding the Equator, appear to be expanding. And that leads to the affected areas becoming hotter and drier. According to the official definition, the tropics extend across the Equator between the

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Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming

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Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming.

“Understanding community assembly rules is a longstanding issue of ecologists,” said Jizhong Zhou, the director of the Institute for Environmental Genomics and a George Lynn Cross Research Professor in the OU College of Arts and Sciences. “We developed a novel framework to quantitatively infer community assembly mechanisms by phylogenetic bin-based null model analysis i.e., iCAMP.”

Using the iCAMP framework, the researchers revealed new findings on the dynamic changes of ecological processes from 2009 to 2014 in grassland bacterial communities under long-term experimental warming.

“In simulated data, iCAMP shows outstanding performance in terms of precision, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and robustness,” Zhou said. “Using iCAMP, we showed that climate warming increased homogeneous selection in soil bacterial

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