Supreme Court Weighs Copyright Fight Between Google and Oracle

The Supreme Court on Wednesday considered a multibillion-dollar copyright battle between

Oracle Corp.

and

Alphabet Inc.’s

Google, with justices appearing to look for a resolution that would retain legal protections for software code without throwing the tech industry into disarray.

During about 90 minutes of oral arguments, the justices considered issues related to how software developers use application-program interfaces, or APIs—prewritten packages of computer code that allow programs, websites or apps to talk to one another.

Oracle has accused Google of illegally copying more than 11,000 lines of Java API code to develop its Android operating system, which runs more than two billion mobile devices world-wide.

Google’s unlicensed use of that code is no better than “if someone wanted to write a book that reproduced the 11,000 best lines of ‘Seinfeld’,” Oracle lawyer Joshua Rosenkranz told the court.

Mr. Rosenkranz said

Microsoft Corp.

and

Apple Inc.

spent billions developing their

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Big tech weighs on U.S., world equities, capping gains on Trump’s improving health

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Large-cap tech stocks weighed on U.S. and European equities on Tuesday despite reassurances about President Donald Trump’s improving health and progress toward a stimulus deal.

Men wearing protective face masks chat in front of a screen displaying Nikkei share average and world stock indexes outside a brokerage, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan October 5, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato

President Trump said he felt “real good” upon returning to the White House after a three-day hospital stay where he received an experimental treatment for COVID-19.

“The view that Trump appears to be on the road of recovery is benefiting the global markets because it indicates that there is stability in the White House,” said Tim Ghriskey, chief investment strategist at Inverness Counsel in New York.

But market-leading large cap tech stocks weighed on U.S. stocks after reports that the U.S. House of Representative’s upcoming

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TikTok fate in the balance as judge weighs app store ban

title=

FILE – This Feb. 25, 2020, file photo, shows the icon for TikTok in New York. TikTok asked a judge to block the Trump Administration’s attempt to ban its app, suggesting the Chinese-owned app’s deal with Oracle and Walmart remains unsettled. An app-store ban, delayed once by the government, is set to go into effect Sunday, Sept. 27, 2020.

AP

Lawyers for TikTok pleaded with a U.S. federal judge on Sunday to delay the Trump Administration’s ban of the popular video sharing program from app stores set to take effect at the end of the day, arguing the move would infringe on First Amendment rights and do irreparable harm to the business.

The 90-minute hearing came after President Donald Trump declared this summer that TikTok was a threat to national security and that it either sold its U.S. operations to U.S. companies or the app would be barred

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