A quantum whodunit — ScienceDaily

In large systems of interacting particles in quantum mechanics, an intriguing phenomenon often emerges: groups of particles begin to behave like single particles. Physicists refer to such groups of particles as quasiparticles.

Understanding the properties of quasiparticles may be key to comprehending, and eventually controlling, technologically important quantum effects like superconductivity and superfluidity.

Unfortunately, quasiparticles are only useful while they live. It is thus particularly unfortunate that many quasiparticles die young, lasting far, far less than a second.

The authors of a new Monash University-led study published today in Physical Review Letters investigate the crucial question: how do quasiparticles die?

Beyond the usual suspect — quasiparticle decay into lower energy states — the authors identify a new culprit: many-body dephasing.

MANY BODY DEPHASING

Many-body dephasing is the disordering of the constituent particles in the quasiparticle that occurs naturally over time.

As the disorder increases, the quasiparticle’s resemblance to

Read More