Earth’s space junk problem is getting worse. And there’s an explosive component.

Before humans first started sending objects into Earth orbit, the pocket of space around our planet was clear and clean. But the launch of Sputnik 1 in October of 1957 changed everything. Since then, the space debris has been accumulating, with the amount of useless, defunct satellites vastly outnumbering the operational objects in our orbit.

A new annual report from the European Space Agency (ESA) has found that while we have become aware of the problem and taken steps in recent years to mitigate it, those steps are currently not keeping up with the sheer scale of space junk.

All spacefaring nations have contributed to the problem, which is significant: as more and more defunct objects populate near-Earth space, the risk of collision rises – which, as objects crash and shatter, produces even more space debris.

The hazards have been prominent in the last year. We have not only watched

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A Major Bitcoin Exchange Is In Even Worse Trouble Than Thought

The bitcoin and cryptocurrency world was rocked last week by news U.S. authorities had levied charges against major bitcoin and crypto exchange BitMEX and its leadership team.

BitMEX executives Arthur Hayes, Benjamin Delo and Samuel Reed were indicted by the U.S. government on October 1, accused of flouting U.S. banking laws while serving American customers.

Now, in a further blow to the controversial Seychelles-based bitcoin and cryptocurrency exchange, the influential blockchain data company Chainalysis has branded BitMEX a “high-risk” exchange—with external data showing investors have removed almost 50,000 bitcoin tokens from BitMEX since last week.

MORE FROM FORBESCoronavirus Has Made Akon’s $6 Billion Crypto-Powered, ‘Real-Life Wakanda’ In Senegal ‘More Necessary’

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The Nobel Prizes Have a Diversity Problem Worse Than the Scientific Fields They Honor | Best Countries

In 2007, I served as a consultant for the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ deliberations about the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. As a result, I was invited to attend the Nobel ceremonies. Staying at the Grand Hotel with all the awardees, I got to see how scientists – excellent but largely unknown outside their fields – suddenly became superstars.

As soon as they’re announced annually in early October, Nobel laureates become role models who are invited to give seminars all around the world. In Stockholm for the awards, these scientists were interviewed on radio and television and hobnobbed with Swedish royalty. Swedish television aired the events of Nobel week live.

As a chemist who has also investigated how science is done, seeing scientists and their research jump to the top of the public’s consciousness thanks to all the Nobel hoopla is gratifying. But in the 119 years since the Nobel

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Tree rings show scale of Arctic pollution is worse than previously thought — ScienceDaily

The largest-ever study of tree rings from Norilsk in the Russian Arctic has shown that the direct and indirect effects of industrial pollution in the region and beyond are far worse than previously thought.

An international team of researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, has combined ring width and wood chemistry measurements from living and dead trees with soil characteristics and computer modelling to show that the damage done by decades of nickel and copper mining has not only devastated local environments, but also affected the global carbon cycle.

The extent of damage done to the boreal forest, the largest land biome on Earth, can be seen in the annual growth rings of trees near Norilsk where die off has spread up to 100 kilometres. The results are reported in the journal Ecology Letters.

Norilsk, in northern Siberia, is the world’s northernmost city with more than 100,000 people,

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Late Recovery In Tech Keeps A Bad Day From Getting Even Worse

Key Takeaways:

  • Financials, Materials, and Industrials have a rough day, mainly on virus fears
  • Concerns about declining chance for fiscal stimulus another bearish factor
  • Tech manages a late-day turnaround, led by Apple, Microsoft, Netflix

A rally in the wilting Tech sector prevented a complete Monday washout. Still, at the end of the day, the week is off to a rough start as concerns about the virus, politics, and banks ganged up on most of Wall Street.

That turnaround in Tech does raise some hopes going into Tuesday. Consider keeping an eye on futures trading overnight to get a sense of whether any of that strength can flow into tomorrow’s open.

Having the Nasdaq (COMP) go positive at one point in the last few minutes was quite a statement, even if COMP couldn’t hold those gains at the close. The area the market depended on so much

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The ransomware crisis is getting worse. We need to make these four big changes

The cruel march of ransomware has apparently reached a grim new milestone. In Germany, authorities are investigating the death of a patient during a ransomware attack on a hospital; according to reports, the woman, who needed urgent medical care, died after being re-routed to a hospital further away, as a nearer hospital was in the midst of dealing with a ransomware attack.

Elsewhere ransomware continues to create painful, if less tragic, disruptions. The UK’s cybersecurity agency has just warned that ransomware groups are launching ‘reprehensible’ attacks against universities as the new academic year starts. On a daily basis, companies large and small are finding their business disrupted when they can least afford to have computer systems failing.

And yet, there seems to be a sense in some quarters that ransomware is simply an inevitable consequence of our digital age. That it is something that we just have to learn to

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