As atmospheric carbon rises, so do rivers, adding to flooding

flood
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

When it comes to climate change, relationships are everything. That’s a key takeaway of a new UO study that examines the interaction between plants, atmospheric carbon dioxide and rising water levels in the Mississippi River.


Published recently in the Geological Society of America’s journal GSA Today, the study compared historical atmospheric carbon data against observations of herbarium leaf specimens to quantify the relationship between rising carbon levels and increasingly catastrophic floods in the American Midwest.

Using data covering more than two centuries, researchers demonstrated that as carbon levels in the atmosphere have risen due to the burning of fossil fuels, the ability of plants to absorb water from the air has decreased. That means more rainfall makes its way into rivers and streams, adding to their potential for damaging floods.

Co-authored by UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History geologist Greg Retallack and earth sciences

Read More

Twitter is building ‘Birdwatch,’ a system to fight misinformation by adding more context to tweets

Twitter is developing a new product called “Birdwatch,” which the company confirms is an attempt at addressing misinformation across its platform by providing more context for tweets, in the form of notes. Tweets can be added to “Birdwatch” — meaning flagged for moderation — from the tweet’s drop-down menu, where other blocking and reporting tools are found today. A small binoculars icon will also appear on tweets published to the Twitter Timeline. When the button is clicked, users are directed to a screen where they can view the tweet’s history of notes.

Based on screenshots of Birdwatch unearthed through reverse engineering techniques, a new tab called “Birdwatch Notes” will be added to Twitter’s sidebar navigation, alongside other existing features like Lists, Topics, Bookmarks and Moments.

This section will allow you to keep track of your own contributions, aka your “Birdwatch Notes.”

The feature was first uncovered this summer in early

Read More

Windows 10 Is Adding a Task Manager Dedicated to Gaming

Windows 10 is adding a Task Manager widget within the Xbox Game Bar to help you manage your computer’s resources without leaving a game.As spotted by WindowsCentral, the new ‘Resources’ widget lets you monitor which programs are causing the most strain on your computer, assess why your in-game performance may be hitching and close programs quickly without tabbing out. You’ll also be able to see how much load there is on your CPU, RAM, DISK and GPU, much like the traditional Task Manager application. It’s a neat timesaver that means you won’t have to alt-tab or hit CTRL+ALT+DELETE so often to figure out your in-game issues.

image (1)

The Windows 10 Task Manager Bar in action.

You can get access to the feature right now by enrolling in the Game Bar – SDK Development app within the Xbox Insider Hub on Windows 10. The Xbox Insider Hub allows Windows and Xbox users

Read More