A close study of the hunger hormone ghrelin shows that it affects how frequently animals eat; without it, they may forget when they last ate — ScienceDaily

A hormone that influences when and how frequently animals eat also appears to affect memory, USC scientists have found.

The study was published in the journal Current Biology on Sept. 17.

Animals and humans have the hormone ghrelin in their stomachs. Ghrelin tells animals, as well as humans, when they are hungry and helps regulate their metabolism, but scientists have never been certain how exactly it works.

To learn more about how ghrelin influences hunger, metabolism and memory, researchers at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences collaborated with international scientists on a study on rats.

They disrupted the ability of the ghrelin hormone to communicate to the vagus nerve, a nerve that signals from the gut to the brain, and then monitored the impact on their feeding and cognitive behaviors.

The rats were not anxious, but they began eating more frequently, said the study’s lead and corresponding

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How the architecture of new home security vision systems affects choice of memory technology

A camera or a computer: How the architecture of new home security vision systems affects choice of memory technology

A long-forecast surge in the number of products based on artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) technologies is beginning to reach mainstream consumer markets.

It is true that research and development teams have found that, in some applications such as autonomous driving, the innate skill and judgement of a human is difficult, or perhaps even impossible, for a machine to learn. But while in some areas the hype around AI has run ahead of the reality, with less fanfare a number of real products based on ML capabilities are beginning to gain widespread interest from consumers. For instance, intelligent vision-based security and home monitoring systems have great potential: analyst firm Strategy Analytics forecasts growth in the home security camera market of more than 50% in the years between 2019 and

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Study suggests population density affects type of inventions — ScienceDaily

The disruptive inventions that make people go “Wow!” tend to come from research in the heart of cities and not in the suburbs, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that, within metro areas, the majority of patents come from innovations created in suburbs — often in the office parks of big tech companies like Microsoft and IBM.

But the unconventional, disruptive innovations — the ones that combine research from different technological fields — are more likely to be produced in cities, said Enrico Berkes, co-author of the study and postdoctoral researcher in economics at The Ohio State University.

These unconventional patents are ones that, for example, may blend research on acoustics with research on information storage — the basis for digital music players like the iPod. Or patents that cite previous work on “vacuum cleaning” and “computing” to produce the Roomba.

“Densely populated cities do not generate more patents than

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