Matt Wells says Texas Tech QB Alan Bowman is ‘day-to-day,’ still undisputed starter

The Red Raiders are three games into the season and find themselves in a difficult position. Texas Tech sits at 1-2 (0-2) headed into Aimes, Ia. to take on no. 24 Iowa State. Like Texas Tech’s last opponent, the Cyclones are riding high after upsetting Oklahoma and taking the Sooners out of the AP top 25.

On top of the difficulty of playing in a stadium where Texas Tech hasn’t won since 2014, the Red Raiders could also be without starting quarterback Alan Bowman. The redshirt sophomore left the game against Kansas State with an apparent leg injury in the first quarter and did not return for the remainder of the game.

“Nothing’s broke. Nothing’s fractured. He’s day-to-day,” Wells said of Bowman’s injury.

When asked if his injury status would change who gets snaps with the first team at practice Wells said “if he doesn’t practice today then [you’ve] got

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Weird Circles Keep Popping Up Around the World. Alan Turing Predicted Them in 1952.

From Popular Mechanics

A pattern described by computer science icon and polymath Alan Turing continues to show up in new scientific research 70 years later. The “Turing pattern” is a widespread phenomenon where noisy systems form stable patterns after being stimulated. The latest example is in “symmetrically spaced” patches of desert grasses, which grow in naturally orderly equilibrium to maximize each patch’s access to limited water.

➡ The world is weird as [email protected]#!. Let’s explore it together.

In Africa and Australia, desert grasses grow in what are called fairy circles. In the new study, published in the Journal of Ecology, scientists explain:

“This pattern has been explained with scale-dependent ecohydrological feedbacks and the reaction-diffusion, or Turing mechanism, used in process-based models that are rooted in physics and pattern-formation theory.”

But modeling a true Turing pattern isn’t as simple as pointing and labeling. Scientists must analyze, which is more challenging

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Ecologists confirm Alan Turing’s theory for Australian fairy circles — ScienceDaily

Fairy circles are one of nature’s greatest enigmas and most visually stunning phenomena. An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has now, for the first time, collected detailed data to show that Alan Turing’s model explains the striking vegetation patterns of the Australian fairy circles. In addition, the researchers showed that the grasses that make up these patterns act as “eco-engineers” to modify their own hostile and arid environment, thus keeping the ecosystem functioning. The results were published in the Journal of Ecology.

Researchers from Germany, Australia and Israel undertook an in-depth fieldwork study in the remote Outback of Western Australia. They used drone technology, spatial statistics, quadrat-based field mapping, and continuous data-recording from a field-weather station. With the drone and a multispectral camera, the researchers mapped the “vitality status” of the Triodia grasses (how strong and how well they grew) in five one-hectare plots and

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