One American, Two Russians Blast off to International Space Station | Top News

By Joey Roulette and Olzhas Auyezov

WASHINGTON/ALMATY (Reuters) – A Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying a U.S. astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts blasted off from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday and successfully reached orbit, live footage broadcast by Russia’s space agency Roscosmos showed.

The crew members travelling to the International Space Station (ISS) are Kate Rubins, a NASA microbiologist who in 2016 became the first person to sequence DNA in space, and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov.

The mission is the last scheduled Russian flight carrying a U.S. crew member.

Since the space shuttle program ended in 2011, NASA has relied on Russia to ferry its astronauts to the space station, an orbiting laboratory 250 miles above Earth that has housed international crews of astronauts continuously for nearly 20 years.

The U.S. space agency in 2014 contracted Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Boeing Co

to build competing space

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American Pikas show resiliency in the face of global warming — ScienceDaily

The American pika is a charismatic, diminutive relative of rabbits that some researchers say is at high risk of extinction due to climate change. Pikas typically live in cool habitats, often in mountains, under rocks and boulders. Because pikas are sensitive to high temperatures, some researchers predict that, as the Earth’s temperature rises, pikas will have to move ever higher elevations until they eventually run out of habitat and die out. Some scientists have claimed this cute little herbivore is the proverbial canary in the coal mine for climate change.

A new extensive review by Arizona State University emeritus professor Andrew Smith, published in the October issue of the Journal of Mammalogy, finds that the American pika is far more resilient in the face of warm temperatures than previously believed. While emphasizing that climate change is a serious threat to the survival of many species on Earth, Smith believes

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5 questions for Kevin Davies on CRISPR and the new era of genome editing | American Enterprise Institute

The past eight years have seen massive strides
forward for the field of genome editing, thanks to a new technology known as
CRISPR. This newfound ability to edit humanity’s genetic code provides both
profound opportunities for human betterment and difficult ethical questions
about how far the technology should be permitted to go. Kevin Davies and I
recently discussed these questions on an episode of Political Economy.

Kevin is the executive editor of The CRISPR Journal and the founding editor of Nature Genetics. He is also the author of several books, including the recently released “Editing Humanity: The CRISPR Revolution and the New Era of Genome Editing.”

Below is an abbreviated transcript of our conversation. You can read our full discussion here. You can also subscribe to my podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher, or download the podcast on Ricochet.

Your book’s title refers to the “CRISPR revolution.” How
far

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Science research and the lessons of World War II | American Enterprise Institute

World War II seems like a pretty obvious example of successful industrial policy, at least in the sense of government directing science research toward specific goals. This from the new working paper “Organizing Crisis Innovation: Lessons from World War II” by Daniel P. Gross and Bhaven N. Sampat: “The [Office of Scientific Research and Development]’s priorities were demand-driven, focused on solving specific military problems, and led by input from the Armed Services. The bulk of its work was applied in nature, and while basic studies were sometimes needed, the urgency of the crisis meant that it mostly had to take basic science as given and to put it to work.”

And Washington’s effort at Big Science produced many notable successes. In just a half-decade, the paper notes, there were major advances across a range of technologies: radar, electrical engineering, jet propulsion, optics, chemistry, and atomic fission. That final one, of

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Without the North American monsoon, reining in wildfires gets harder — ScienceDaily

The North American monsoon has dictated the length of wildfire season for centuries in the U.S.-Mexico border region, according to new University of Arizona research that can inform land management amid global climate change.

But this year was anything but normal. The 2020 monsoon season was the second-driest on record, and many high-profile wildfires swept across the Sonoran Desert and surrounding sky islands. Putting an end to severe fires may only become harder as climate change makes monsoon storms less frequent and more extreme, say the authors of a new study published in the International Journal of Wildland Fire.

The U.S. may be able to learn from Mexico’s wildfire management strategy, the researchers say.

“These large fire years are the result of many factors, but fire weather and seasonal climate loom very large in the picture. In the case of (Tucson’s) Bighorn Fire (this summer), for example, we had

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Did COVID-19 steal your sales? This is how 9 Latin American startups successfully entered e-commerce


5 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Technological innovation and process optimization are booming. Changes and restrictions in physical interaction since the pandemic have forced companies to change the way they operate and do business, the recent McKinsey & Company survey “What 800 executives envision for the postpandemic workface ” conducted of executives of companies around the world, shows that a third of companies have accelerated the digitization of their supply chains, half have accelerated the digitization of their customer service channels, and two-thirds have more quickly adopted artificial intelligence and automation.

Undoubtedly, the pandemic has shown us that the digitization of companies of any size is necessary and that being prepared and being able to adapt quickly is essential. There has been an important

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American Airlines technology director fatally shot while walking his dog in Dallas, police say

Detectives believe the suspect was in a black Nissan pick-up truck that may have a Texas Rangers sticker in the rear window.

DALLAS — Updated at 3:17 p.m. Saturday with a statement from James Faith’s workplace. 

Dallas police are asking for the public’s help in their search for a suspected shooter who killed a 49-year-old man. 

Authorities said around 7:30 a.m. Friday, James Faith left his house with his wife to walk their dog in the 1000 block of Waverly Drive. While walking the dog an unknown suspect approached them and fatally shot Faith, police said. 

Faith worked with Fort-Worth based American Airlines, as a technology director. The company released the following statement Saturday: 

“American Airlines is deeply saddened by the death of James Faith, a director in our technology organization. We are taking care of James’ family and colleagues and our thoughts and prayers are with them during this

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First study to compare dietary signatures of African and South American mammals in quest to reconstruct ancient ecosystems finds need for revisions — ScienceDaily

Closed-canopy rainforests are a vital part of the Earth’s modern ecosystems, but tropical plants don’t preserve well in the fossil record so it is difficult to tell how long these habitats have existed and where rainforests might have once grown. Instead, scientists look to the diets of extinct animals, which lock evidence of the vegetation they ate into their teeth. A new study led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History finds that the paradigm used to identify closed-canopy rainforests through dietary signatures needs to be reassessed. The findings are published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“The Amazon is the world’s most diverse rainforest, home to one in 10 known species on Earth,” said Julia Tejada-Lara, who led the study as a graduate student at the Museum and Columbia University. “Closed-canopy rainforests have been proposed to occur in this area

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Trump doesn’t respect science, or the American people

  • The president ridiculed safety precautions, held a superspreader event, contracted COVID, was hospitalized, is now back at the White House, and the American public has no idea if he’s even been tested, much less if he’s still contagious.
  • Trump said COVID will “miraculously” disappear and rejected the reality of climate change, saying “It will start getting cooler, just you watch.”
  • He thinks basic science doesn’t apply to him and the results of his COVID tests are none of our business. That’s a threat to Americans’ lives.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump has brazenly flouted even the simplest of COVID-19 safety precautions and encouraged others to do the same. On his watch, the White House became the hotspot responsible for a surge in DC-area COVID cases. 

And even after it became clear that

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American Express Shares Cut to Neutral on Valuation

American Express shares were cut to neutral from buy by Susquehanna analyst James Friedman, based on a full valuation at the credit card and travel services company.

His rating was at buy for at least three years, according to MarketWatch. Friedman affirmed his share-price target at $110.

“It would be hard for [the company] to do better than its merchants, so consensus 2021 revenue up 11% looks full to us,” Friedman wrote in a commentary, according to MarketWatch. He said 7.5% growth is more like it, according to The Fly.

AmEx shares recently traded at $105.31, down 0.7%. They had fallen 15% year to date through Thursday. They also have risen 11% since Sept. 24, including Friday’s move.

Morningstar analyst Eric Compton sees American Express close to his fair-value estimate of $108.

“Investors should expect a difficult year for AmEx, as the company battles the coronavirus pandemic,” he wrote in

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