Cannabis use appears to encourage, not replace, non-medical opioid use — ScienceDaily

Contrary to some claims, people in the U.S may not be substituting cannabis for opioids, according to new research at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. The study examined the direction and strength of association between cannabis and opioid use over 90 consecutive days among adults who used non-medical opioids. The findings showed that opioid use was at least as prevalent on days when cannabis was used as on days when it was not, and that this was irrespective whether participants were experiencing pain or not. The study, published in the scientific journal Addiction, is among the first to test opioid substitution directly.

The study, which compared the probability of non-medical opioid use on days when cannabis was used with days when cannabis was not used, included 13,271 days of observation among 211 participants from the greater New York area. The participants were predominantly male, urban, unemployed, unmarried,

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North Korea Unveils What Appears to Be New ICBM During Military Parade

In his 2020 New Year’s message, a defiant Mr. Kim said his country no longer felt bound by its self-declared nuclear and ICBM test moratorium and vowed to show the world a “new strategic weapon.” But until the military parade on Saturday, no display of such a weapon materialized, as North Korea seemed preoccupied with fighting Covid-19 and extensive flood damage.

During his speech, Mr. Kim reiterated his claim that the country had no cases of Covid-19, and a large, maskless crowd gathered for the parade. Outside experts are skeptical about the claim, given the country’s poor public health system.

Harry J. Kazianis, senior director of Korean studies at the Washington-based Center for the National Interest, said that the new ICBM seems to be a derivative of the Hwasong-15. But it is “much bigger and clearly more powerful than anything” in the North Korean arsenal, indicating that it could carry

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When And Where You Can See Mars Shine With A ‘Harvest Moon’ While Venus Appears As ‘Double Star’

On Friday, October 2—just a day after Thursday’s full “Harvest Moon” rises at dusk—our satellite will appear to pass very close to a very bright planet Mars.

It’s going to be a special sight, and a reasonably rare one, too, because Mars is about to reach its brightest since 2003.

Do you know where and in the night sky to watch the moonrise and a Mars-rise? Or when to catch it?

Here’s exactly what you need to know to see this special celestial sight just after dusk on Friday—and the bonus sight of Venus shining super-close to bright star Regulus.

MORE FROM FORBESWhat’s That Really Bright ‘Star’ In The Night Sky?

When to

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‘iPhone 12 mini’ Name Appears in Leaked Apple iPhone 12 Case Stickers

Earlier this week a proven leaker claimed that the iPhone 12 lineup would be named “iPhone 12 mini,” “iPhone 12,” “iPhone 12 Pro,” and “iPhone 12 Pro Max,” and today the same nomenclature has appeared again in a photo depicting alleged stickers from unreleased Silicone iPhone cases originating from Apple’s international distribution center in Ireland.


The photo shows three stickers with the associated handset sizes written alongside them, corresponding to the three expected sizes of iPhone 12, with the 5.4-inch model being the “‌iPhone 12‌ mini,” the 6.7-inch model being the ‌”iPhone 12‌ Pro Max,” and the two 6.1-inch models being the ‌”iPhone 12‌ / ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro.”

The color for all three Silicone cases is black, and the model numbers that can be clearly made out include “MHL732M/A” and “MHLG32M/A,” neither of which Apple has used in the past.

The photo was shared by Twitter leaker DuanRui, who

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Black Hole From Iconic Image Appears to Be Wobbling

Black hole M87*.

Black hole M87*.
Image: EHT Collaboration

Scientists are learning important new things about the first-ever directly imaged black hole, including behaviors consistent with Einsteinian theory, but it’s also showing an unexpected feature in the form of a very wobbly ring.

Seems like forever ago, but we finally got to feast our eyes on the apparently unseeable back in April 2019, when this incredible image of a supermassive black hole was first released. Of course, we can’t actually “see” the black hole, because, as any 6-year-old will happily tell you, black holes have a habit of sucking up light. What the picture does show, however, is an asymmetric ring, known as the black hole’s shadow, of superheated gas swirling around the black hole’s event horizon—that boundary beyond which light cannot escape.

This particular black hole, with the mass of 6.5 billion Suns, is located 55 million light-years away

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Twitter is looking into why its photo preview appears to favor white faces over Black faces

Twitter it was looking into why the neural network it uses to generate photo previews apparently chooses to show white people’s faces more frequently than Black faces.

Several Twitter users demonstrated the issue over the weekend, posting examples of posts that had a Black person’s face and a white person’s face. Twitter’s preview showed the white faces more often.

The informal testing began after a Twitter user tried to post about a problem he noticed in Zoom’s facial recognition, which was not showing the face of a Black colleague on calls. When he posted to Twitter, he noticed it too was favoring his white face over his Black colleague’s face.

Users discovered the preview algorithm chose non-Black cartoon characters as well.

When Twitter first began using the neural network to automatically crop photo previews, machine learning researchers explained in a blog post how they started with facial recognition to crop

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